Hundreds of Historic Manuscripts. Thousands More Being Digitized.

Collection

    • A
    • B
    • C
    • E
    • F
    • G
    • H
    • J
    • K
    • L
    • M
    • N
    • P
    • R
    • T
    • V
    • W
    • A
    • B
    • C
    • D
    • E
    • F
    • H
    • L
    • M
    • N
    • P
    • R
    • S
    • T
    • W
    • Z
    • A
    • B
    • C
    • D
    • E
    • F
    • G
    • H
    • J
    • K
    • M
    • N
    • P
    • R
    • S
    • W
Year
All
All Decades
  • 1750
  • 1760
  • 1770
  • 1780
  • 1790
  • 1800
  • 1810
  • 1820
  • 1830
  • 1840
  • 1850
  • 1860
  • 1870
  • 1880
  • 1890
  • 1900
  • 1910
  • 1920
  • 1930
  • 1940
  • 1950
  • 1960
  • 1970
  • 1980
  • 1990
All Years
  • 1700
  • 1701
  • 1702
  • 1703
  • 1704
  • 1705
  • 1706
  • 1707
  • 1708
  • 1709
All Years
  • 1710
  • 1711
  • 1712
  • 1713
  • 1714
  • 1715
  • 1716
  • 1717
  • 1718
  • 1719
All Years
  • 1720
  • 1721
  • 1722
  • 1723
  • 1724
  • 1725
  • 1726
  • 1727
  • 1728
  • 1729
All Years
  • 1730
  • 1731
  • 1732
  • 1733
  • 1734
  • 1735
  • 1736
  • 1737
  • 1738
  • 1739
All Years
  • 1740
  • 1741
  • 1742
  • 1743
  • 1744
  • 1745
  • 1746
  • 1747
  • 1748
  • 1749
All Years
  • 1750
  • 1751
  • 1752
  • 1753
  • 1754
  • 1755
  • 1756
  • 1757
  • 1758
  • 1759
All Years
  • 1760
  • 1761
  • 1762
  • 1763
  • 1764
  • 1765
  • 1766
  • 1767
  • 1768
  • 1769
All Years
  • 1770
  • 1771
  • 1772
  • 1773
  • 1774
  • 1775
  • 1776
  • 1777
  • 1778
  • 1779
All Years
  • 1780
  • 1781
  • 1782
  • 1783
  • 1784
  • 1785
  • 1786
  • 1787
  • 1788
  • 1789
All Years
  • 1790
  • 1791
  • 1792
  • 1793
  • 1794
  • 1795
  • 1796
  • 1797
  • 1798
  • 1799
All Years
  • 1800
  • 1801
  • 1802
  • 1803
  • 1804
  • 1805
  • 1806
  • 1807
  • 1808
  • 1809
All Years
  • 1810
  • 1811
  • 1812
  • 1813
  • 1814
  • 1815
  • 1816
  • 1817
  • 1818
  • 1819
All Years
  • 1820
  • 1821
  • 1822
  • 1823
  • 1824
  • 1825
  • 1826
  • 1827
  • 1828
  • 1829
All Years
  • 1830
  • 1831
  • 1832
  • 1833
  • 1834
  • 1835
  • 1836
  • 1837
  • 1838
  • 1839
All Years
  • 1840
  • 1841
  • 1842
  • 1843
  • 1844
  • 1845
  • 1846
  • 1847
  • 1848
  • 1849
All Years
  • 1850
  • 1851
  • 1852
  • 1853
  • 1854
  • 1855
  • 1856
  • 1857
  • 1858
  • 1859
All Years
  • 1860
  • 1861
  • 1862
  • 1863
  • 1864
  • 1865
  • 1866
  • 1867
  • 1868
  • 1869
All Years
  • 1870
  • 1871
  • 1872
  • 1873
  • 1874
  • 1875
  • 1876
  • 1877
  • 1878
  • 1879
All Years
  • 1880
  • 1881
  • 1882
  • 1883
  • 1884
  • 1885
  • 1886
  • 1887
  • 1888
  • 1889
All Years
  • 1890
  • 1891
  • 1892
  • 1893
  • 1894
  • 1895
  • 1896
  • 1897
  • 1898
  • 1899
All Years
  • 1900
  • 1901
  • 1902
  • 1903
  • 1904
  • 1905
  • 1906
  • 1907
  • 1908
  • 1909
All Years
  • 1910
  • 1911
  • 1912
  • 1913
  • 1914
  • 1915
  • 1916
  • 1917
  • 1918
  • 1919
All Years
  • 1920
  • 1921
  • 1922
  • 1923
  • 1924
  • 1925
  • 1926
  • 1927
  • 1928
  • 1929
All Years
  • 1930
  • 1931
  • 1932
  • 1933
  • 1934
  • 1935
  • 1936
  • 1937
  • 1938
  • 1939
All Years
  • 1940
  • 1941
  • 1942
  • 1943
  • 1944
  • 1945
  • 1946
  • 1947
  • 1948
  • 1949
All Years
  • 1950
  • 1951
  • 1952
  • 1953
  • 1954
  • 1955
  • 1956
  • 1957
  • 1958
  • 1959
All Years
  • 1960
  • 1961
  • 1962
  • 1963
  • 1964
  • 1965
  • 1966
  • 1967
  • 1968
  • 1969
All Years
  • 1970
  • 1971
  • 1972
  • 1973
  • 1974
  • 1975
  • 1976
  • 1977
  • 1978
  • 1979
All Years
  • 1980
  • 1981
  • 1982
  • 1983
  • 1984
  • 1985
  • 1986
  • 1987
  • 1988
  • 1989
All Years
  • 1990
  • 1991
  • 1992
  • 1993
  • 1994
  • 1995
  • 1996
  • 1997
  • 1998
  • 1999
Month
All
All Months
  • Jan
  • Feb
  • Mar
  • Apr
  • May
  • Jun
  • Jul
  • Aug
  • Sep
  • Oct
  • Nov
  • Dec
Day
All
All Days
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14
  • 15
  • 16
  • 17
  • 18
  • 19
  • 20
  • 21
  • 22
  • 23
  • 24
  • 25
  • 26
  • 27
  • 28
  • 29
  • 30
  • 31

Topic

Human Aspect

Type

Attribute

Save Search Parameters
Clear All

Manuscripts (121)

SORT BY
Last Added
  • Last Added
  • Date Written
  • A-Z
  • Relevance
The Baltimore Plot and Attempted Assassination of Abraham Lincoln

Autograph Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 2024

Add to History Board Share
Robert E. Lee's Famous Letter Declining to Furlough, As a Rule, Jewish Confederate Troops for the High Holidays

Autograph Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 2494

Add to History Board Share
Truman on the Recognition of the Jewish State and the

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 370

Two days into the Israeli War of Independence, Harry Truman thanks a rabbi for his offer to assist the President, and refers to the fledgling state's situation as "very dark."
Add to History Board Share
Ten-Cent Henry Rice Sutler Coin

Historical artifacts

1 page

SMC 2241

Ten-Cent Sutler coin of Henry Rice, a close friend of President Lincoln's. A sutler is a civilian merchant who sells goods and provisions to soldiers, usually out of the back of a wagon, with which he would follow the moving army.
Add to History Board Share
Lincoln Family Friend Edward Jonas Recalls Abraham Lincoln and the Lincoln-Douglas Debates

Autograph Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 398

Edward Jonas recalls his interactions with Abraham Lincoln during the Lincoln-Douglas Debates of 1858. Though he was a young boy at the time, he recounted how Lincoln exchanged stories with him and listened extremely attentively to him.
Add to History Board Share
Theodore Roosevelt: “What a Dreadful Creature Wilson is!”

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 1272

One of Roosevelt's many jabs at Wilson, whom he labelled a coward for failing to declare war on Germany in 1915 after the sinking of the Lusitania.
Add to History Board Share
Palestine, Truman Says, is a “Matter of Considerable Disturbance” to be Determined by U.N.

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 686

Add to History Board Share
General Eisenhower Approves a Soldier's Request to Shoot Captured Reich Marshal Goering -

Autograph Note Signed

1 page

SMC 702

Eisenhower had ordered every soldier not on the front to tour a concentration camp in order to understand not only the magnitude of the Holocaust, but the enemy itself. As a result, one soldier put in a request to shoot Hermann Goering, if he was indeed to be shot. Goering was sentenced to death by hanging, but took his own life in his cell. Here, Eisenhower refers to the corpulent Goering as "that fat ___"
Add to History Board Share
Homesick General Eisenhower Writes of a WWII Visit to Jerusalem and Levant at Christmas

Autograph Letter Signed

3 pages

SMC 708

Homesick Eisenhower writes to his wife to thank her for Christmas gifts and to express his longing to see her. He omits his recent promotion as Supreme Commander of the Allied Expeditionary Forces.
Add to History Board Share
After His

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 715

President Kennedy thanks General Landon, the Commander in Chief of the United States Air Force in Europe for the "magnificent way" in which the General ensured that Kennedy's visit to Germany was a success.
Add to History Board Share
Ben-Gurion: Had a Jewish State Been Established in 1937, Millions of Jews Would Not Have Died in the Holocaust

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 765

Add to History Board Share
David Ben-Gurion Compares, Favorably, the Fledgling IDF to George Washington's Revolutionary Army

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 766

At a critical juncture, when Israel was vastly outnumbered, Ben-Gurion compares the fledgling IDF to "an army that had been established by the owner of an estate in Virginia." Though Ben-Gurion compares the IDF to George Washington's Revolutionary Army and wishes to learn from it, he also claims that the Jewish people's situation is "different from any other nation."
Add to History Board Share
Einstein, Working to Save Jews from Hitler, Discusses

Typed Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 794

Einstein discusses the Brown Book, an expose documenting, amongst other things, the oppression of Jews. The growing momentum of speaking out against Nazism was encouraging for Einstein, but he thought that it would be more impactful if the criticism came from "only foreign non-Jews." Einstein understood that with his high profile, his public condemnation of Germany would have deadly consequences for German Jews.
Add to History Board Share
Albert Einstein Advises a Young Refugee From Germany, Then Controlled By What He Called

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 796

Einstein encourages a young German immigrant to stay in California, as it offers more opportunities than Palestine; he advises against returning to Europe, from where, as he put it, "no good can come." He especially warns against Germany, controlled by "The Hitler Gang."
Add to History Board Share
Einstein On His Anti-Nazi Work:

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 801

In 1943, Albert Einstein writes to Lionel Ettlinger that had people only listened to the pair of them, the horrors of the Holocaust could have been avoided. Einstein had travelled throughout Belgium and England in 1933 - shortly after Ettlinger had released a documentary about the German aggression against the Jews in Europe - warning anyone who would listen.
Add to History Board Share
Buchanan Approves Abraham Lincoln’s Ordering Fremont to Rescind His Emancipation Proclamation

Autograph Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 984

Add to History Board Share
Napoleon, at the Siege of Acre, Orders His Troops and Generals to be Paid

Document Signed

1 page

SMC 999

Bogged down at the Siege of Acre on what, only weeks before, he thought would be a quick victory on his way to Jerusalem, Napoleon here orders that his generals and the infantry, lancers and sappers, be paid.
Add to History Board Share
Account of Execution of Deserters at Beverly Ford Mentions  Rabbi Praying With One of the Condemned Men

Autograph Letter Signed

5 pages

SMC 1026

Captain Jacob Winans writes to his father about the execution of deserters at Beverly Ford, mentioning the presence of a rabbi to pray with one of the convicted soldiers.
Add to History Board Share
Breathtaking Detailed Eyewitness Account of the Execution of Deserters at Beverly Ford

Autograph Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 1027

This eyewitness account details the chronology of events, or protocol of the execution of deserters at Beverly Ford. Those executed had with them the clergyman of their faith. They "were accompanied by a Catholic priest, a Jewish Rabbi and a Methodist preacher."
Add to History Board Share
Lincoln Interjects Himself Into a Case of Two Jewish Merchants Charged With Selling Goods to Blockaders

Autograph Note Signed

1 page

SMC 1038

Meyer and Philip Wallach were Jewish brothers who were charged with selling goods to blockaders and were held at an infamous prison for Confederate officers. Here, President Lincoln protects them by ordering the head of the prison to keep them in his custody - to neither send them away or allow them to be transferred.
Add to History Board Share
Napoleon Bonaparte Authorizes a Soldier to Join the Egyptian Campaign in Syria

Document Signed

1 page

SMC 1040

Signed as General-in-Chief, Bonaparte signs papers for a soldier to join his campaign in Syria. The campaigns were deployed for French commercial interests, with the additional motivation of disrupting Britain's.
Add to History Board Share
James K. Polk Gives Orders for a Fireproof Celebration for the Battle of Cerro Gordo in Washington

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 1052

Here Polk-mindful of the dangers of unattended candles and oil lamps-gives orders not to illuminate public offices in honor of General Scott’s victory at the Battle of Cerro Gordo.
Add to History Board Share
Former President Millard Fillmore: Abraham Lincoln's Election Caused the War

Autograph Letter Signed

4 pages

SMC 1061

In this sometimes scathing letter mostly concerning Thurlow Weed, former President Millard Fillmore can say only one good thing about him: Weed was "the first among his friends to see and admit the danger to the country from Lincoln's election."
Add to History Board Share
Millard Fillmore Asks Lincoln for a Favor; On the Back of the Letter, Lincoln Takes Steps to Oblige Him

Autograph Endorsement Signed

1 page

SMC 1065

Former President Fillmore asks President Lincoln to intercede on behalf of his nephew, a disgraced lieutenant. On the verso of the letter, Lincoln takes steps to oblige Fillmore, but ultimately did not intervene in the case.
Add to History Board Share
Abraham Lincoln's Appointment of Benjamin F. Isherwood, the Creator of the Steam Navy

Document Signed

1 page

SMC 1081

Benjamin Isherwood designed steamboats that would quickly outrun blockade runners. Isherwood expanded the US Navy's fleet from 28 to 600 steam vessels in the course of the Civil War. Here, President Abraham Lincoln appoints Isherwood Chief of the Bureau of Steam Engineering.
Add to History Board Share
Abraham Lincoln's Order That Sparked the New York City Draft Riots of 1863

Document Signed

1 page

SMC 1084

Abraham Lincoln's draft order for the state of New York, which sparked riots and racially-motivated violence and murders. It was the second largest civil insurrection in American history.
Add to History Board Share
Abraham Lincoln Reacts to Attempted Jail-Break of Confederate POWs on Johnson Island

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 1090

This note from Lincoln to the Naval Secretary Gideon Welles instructs him to get a firsthand report about the infamous attempted prison break of Confederate POWs on Johnson's Island.
Add to History Board Share
Oliver Wendell Holmes: At Fort Stevens, Abraham Lincoln Was Forced to Duck From Enemy Fire

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 1106

Associate Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes confirms that during the Civil War, when he was serving as a captain, President Abraham Lincoln came to visit the troops at Fort Stevens, during which they were fired upon. This was the only time in American history a sitting president has exposed himself to combat. President Lincoln was forced to duck from enemy fire.
Add to History Board Share
A Union Officer in the Field Describes the Reaction to News of Abraham Lincoln's Assassination

Autograph Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 1128

Here, an Ohio lieutenant, serving in Alabama, describes how the troops there received, and took, "news of the shocking murder of our president."
Add to History Board Share
Dr. Jacob Da Silva Solis Cohen Certifies the 1864 Death of a

Document Signed

1 page

SMC 1132

Here J. Solis Cohen certifies the death of a former slave in Philadelphia, identifying him as a "Contraband": a legally complicated and politically fraught designation indicating a "self-emancipated" human chattel, many of whom, as the Union armies moved in the South, rushed toward the advancing troops, there to join the ranks of their liberators.
Add to History Board Share
Theodore Roosevelt Bitterly Regrets Being Forced to Sit Through WWI At Home

Typed Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 1253

Roosevelt has lost one son to the Great War, and two have been badly injured in it. He can't stand the idea that his sons have been put in harm's way, whilst he remains at home, and finds it terrible that the war takes the young. Roosevelt also finds it "more terrible, of course, if the young fear to face death in a great crisis for a great cause."
Add to History Board Share
A Final Roar: In One of His Last Letters, Theodore Roosevelt Blasts Woodrow Wilson

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 1256

Three days before he died, Theodore Roosevelt, by then unable to rise from the sofa and write, dictated this letter. In it, he finds the strength to lambast Woodrow Wilson for erring "in intellectual honesty and moral straight-forwardness," as well as finding fault in his own "single error," which was to support Wilson for the first sixty days of World War I.
Add to History Board Share
A Rare Abraham Lincoln Quote from Shakespeare's Othello

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 414

Here, relating to the Mexican War ending, Abraham Lincoln alludes to "Othello's occupation's gone."
Add to History Board Share
Theodore Roosevelt Arranges a Dramatic Presentation About the Rough Riders

Typed Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 424

Roosevelt arranges to meet Mason Mitchell, whom he deems "the only Rough Rider with dramatic and literary capacity," in order to discuss their dramatic presentation about the Rough Riders.
Add to History Board Share
Shortly After Firing General MacArthur, President Truman Writes of His

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 428

In the days following MacArthur's dismissal, and all of the upheaval surrounding it, President Truman thanks his Secretary of State Dean Acheson for his unwavering support and friendship.
Add to History Board Share
Harry Truman Looks at the Potsdam Conference 12 Years Later: An Astonishing Appraisal of What Went Wrong

Autograph Letter Signed

8 pages

SMC 429

Knowing that his papers would be released for reporters to examine his version of the Potsdam Conference twelve years prior, Harry Truman paints a revisionist history of what happened and what went wrong.
Add to History Board Share
It Was His Boyhood Reading, Harry Truman Recalls, That Prepared Him for When His

Autograph Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 430

Harry Truman, the only U.S. President of the 20th century who did not receive a university education, reflects on how his childhood love of reading and self-education prepared him for his sudden ascent to the presidency.
Add to History Board Share
President Abraham Lincoln Appoints Jewish West Pointer Alfred Mordecai Jr. Second Lieutenant

Document Signed

1 page

SMC 445

President Abraham Lincoln appoints Alfred Mordecai Jr. a Second Lieutenant four months into the Civil War. Mordecai would climb the ranks and die a general.
Add to History Board Share
Abraham Lincoln's Check to His Son, Robert Lincoln, to Equip Him For Service Under Grant

Check Signed

1 page

SMC 456

Check from Abraham Lincoln to his son, Robert Todd Lincoln. The president had finally allowed his son to serve in the war, and made sure he was sent to General Grant. This check was to ensure that his son was properly kitted out for war.
Add to History Board Share
Theodore Roosevelt Decries the Deprivations Suffered by His Rough Riders After Battle of San Juan Hill

Typed Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 465

Colonel Theodore Roosevelt writes to the father of one of his soldiers who was taken ill with typhoid fever. He thanks the father for his offer to send some food to the soldiers but condemns the government for not providing enough food, supplies, and medical treatment to his cavalry.
Add to History Board Share
FDR's 1938 Plan to Settle Jewish and

Typed Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 473

In 1938, Franklin Delano Roosevelt remarks, in the strictest privacy, that "in the crowded state of affairs in some nations in Europe and in certain areas of the United States, existing situations could be relieved by a small but fairly constant stream of emigrants to the unoccupied parts of the world." FDR is referring here to not only "white" refugees, but to European Jews as well.
Add to History Board Share
Contemporary Copy of Chase's Letter to Abraham Lincoln in Support of General Hunter's Emancipation Order

Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 501

Salomon P. Chase, President Lincoln's Secretary of the Treasury, was the most ardent abolitionist in Lincoln's cabinet. Here, he praises General Hunter's declaration of emancipation of all slaves in South Carolina, Georgia and Florida.
Add to History Board Share
David Ben Gurion on Anwar Sadat's Wanting Peace in 1971: He Isn't Convinced

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 508

David Ben Gurion places responsibility for peace with the Egyptians at their feet, but also remarks that "a great deal depends on Russia."
Add to History Board Share
John F. Kennedy: National Security and Future of the Space Program Depend on Ending Labor Strife Delays

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 523

John F. Kennedy views the delays with the labor unions as a threat to not only the space program, but to national security. He urges Arthur Goldberg, the Secretary of Labor, to come to a swift arrangement with union leaders in order to resume the space race against the Soviets.
Add to History Board Share
Early John F. Kennedy Letter About the Death of His Brother Joe, Which Would Propel Him Into Politics

Typed Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 524

This letter thanking Miss Forbush for her condolences and prayers on the occasion of Joe Jr.'s death in World War II marks the beginning of John F. Kennedy's shouldering the mantle of his father's political aspirations.
Add to History Board Share
With World War I Still Raging, Theodore Roosevelt Mourns His Fallen Son

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 550

Writing a fortnight after the death of his favorite son, Quentin, Theodore Roosevelt admits his difficulty, and remarks that "the old should not live when the young die."
Add to History Board Share
A Fateful Appointment: Abraham Lincoln Makes William T. Sherman a General

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 566

Shortly after having been part of the Union loss at the Battle of Bull Run, Lincoln, in an effort to encourage the troops, promotes Sherman to General. Sherman would devastate the South and ensure Union victory three years later.
Add to History Board Share
Lincoln Would be Glad to See General Milroy but knows

Autograph Note Signed

1 page

SMC 570

Abraham Lincoln gracefully sidesteps a meeting with the problematic General Milroy, who was arrested for losing half of his troops. Milroy railed against his superiors, who jailed him for his actions, and continuously pestered Lincoln for his release and restoration to command.
Add to History Board Share

Autograph Letter Signed

3 pages

SMC 586

Here, just six days after Abraham Lincoln won the presidency with a scant 40% of the vote, Former President John Tyler laments the election.
Add to History Board Share
General Edmund Allenby Commemorates His Victorious Entrance Into Jerusalem One Year Later

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 595

General Edmund Allenby, in celebrating the Allied victory of World War I, humbly commemorates the year anniversary of his conquering of Jerusalem.
Add to History Board Share

Broadside

1 page

SMC 625

South Carolina proclaims it has dissolved its bonds to the United States, becoming the first state to secede.
Add to History Board Share
Harper's Weekly With Illustrated Story About Five Union Soldiers, Including a Jew, Executed for Desertion

Ephemera

3 pages

SMC 650

Original Harper's Weekly for September 26, 1863 about the execution of five Union deserters at Beverly Ford; with illustrations.
Add to History Board Share
David Ben-Gurion on God’s Promises to His People: Strength and Peace – One Given, the Other, Coming

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 664

Two years before the Yom Kippur War, and quoting from Psalms, David Ben Gurion tells a correspondent that there is definitely trouble brewing with Egypt, yet God promises his people two things: strength and peace. The former is obtained, and the latter, Ben-Gurion has faith, is coming.
Add to History Board Share
A Historic Memo: Harry Truman Salutes Dean Acheson's Crucial Role in Going to War With Korea

Autograph Note Signed

2 pages

SMC 685

President Harry Truman commends Dean Acheson as Secretary of State for superbly handling events leading up to the Korean War.
Add to History Board Share
Horatio Nelson Rejoices at the Raising of the Siege of Acre - And Napoleon's Fleeing

Autograph Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 108

Nelson jubilantly reports that the French are being pushed back from Acre and from Zante (Greece), pleased at Napoleon "the villain's" ignominious end.
Add to History Board Share
Simon Wolf's Original Contract For the Book

Document Signed

3 pages

SMC 109

This contract between author and scholar Simon Wolf, and publisher and editor Louis E. Levy, is a seminal document of a seminal work, The American Jew as Patriot, Soldier and Citizen, first published in 1895 and still in print, and use, over one hundred years later.
Add to History Board Share
T.E. Lawrence on Palestine: No One Trusts the British for More Than Two Minutes

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 110

Primarily discussing his book "The Seven Pillars of Wisdom," T.E. Lawrence confides in Brig. General Sir Gilbert Falkingham Clayton that no person of any "race or creed" living in Palestine trusts the British for "more than two minutes." If they would, he ruefully comments, "things would be more stable there."
Add to History Board Share
T.E. Lawrence Wants to

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 111

T.E. Lawrence writes to his superior at the Arab Bureau, General Clayton, to ask if he should send a letter he wrote to Sir Mark Sykes, the man responsible for divvying up the Middle East between the English and the French. Here, Lawrence mentions to Clayton that the "Jewish section" should be cleared up, and when they fight the French, the French section will fall into English hands, as well.
Add to History Board Share

Autograph Letter Signed

3 pages

SMC 127

Despite being condemned by the Chief Justice and public opinion, Buchanan, unwaveringly trusts in the words of his Secretary of War, James Holt, who wrote that Buchanan's "labors will yet be crowned by the glory that belongs to an enlightened Statesmanship & to an unsullied patriotism."
Add to History Board Share
At the behest of President Lincoln, General Grant Decline's Lee's Suggestion of Armistice Negotiations

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 147

General Grant obediently replies to Secretary of War Edward Stanton with repeated crossed out protestations that he was not trying to usurp any authority. He had previously written to Stanton to ask if he could accept General Lee's invitation to negotiate an armistice, and had received a rebuke from President Lincoln himself.
Add to History Board Share
Benjamin Mordecai, Jewish Benefactor of Confederate Cause Honored by the Famed Palmetto Riflemen

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 148

Benjamin Mordecai graciously responds to the soldiers of the Palmetto Riflemen, who had thanked him for his donation.
Add to History Board Share
Ronald Reagan Writes About How Jews from the Warsaw Ghetto Joined the Polish Uprising Against the Nazis

Autograph Letter Signed

3 pages

SMC 150

Ronald Reagan denounces socialism to a correspondent abroad, and makes special mention of the atrocities committed by the socialism of the Soviets and the Germans during World War II. Reagan mentions that the Soviets held back whilst the Nazis slaughtered the Polish freedom fighters who were mostly, he mistakenly claims, Jews from the Ghetto.
Add to History Board Share
Jewish Civil War Union Surgeon Morris Asch Rules on Another Surgeon's Exorbitant Bill

Autograph Endorsement Signed

6 pages

SMC 157

A Dr. McCoy, accused by the Surgeon General of charging exorbitantly for emergency services rendered, has had his bill cut in half. Asch rejects McCoy's appeal, and upholds the decision to reduce the bill.
Add to History Board Share
Abraham Lincoln Appoints Henry Ernest Goodman as Surgeon of Civil War Union Volunteer Army

Document Signed

1 page

SMC 160

President Abraham Lincoln promotes the eminent and beloved physician, Henry Ernest Goodman, of Philadelphia, from assistant surgeon to surgeon. Edward Stanton, the Secretary of war, co-signed the document.
Add to History Board Share
Congressman Lincoln Praises Future Vice President of Confederacy for his Opposition to the Mexican War

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 161

In 1848, Abraham Lincoln and Alexander H. Stephens were both Whig supporters of Henry Polk, and ardently against the Mexican War. Here, Lincoln praises Stephens. Thirteen years after their short-lived alliance, the country was embroiled in a civil war; Lincoln was President of the United States, and Stephens Vice President of the Confederacy.
Add to History Board Share
In Refusing a Parole, Lincoln Notes That Federal Prisoners Are Being

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 162

Here, Lincoln replies to a request from his wife Mary’s cousin, Lyman Todd, that he cannot "enlarge on parole" a Colonel Smith. Such a thing would set a precedent, he says, upon which nearly all the prisoners held by the Union might act – and this, in the face of how the Confederacy was treating Federal prisoners, is completely unacceptable.
Add to History Board Share
Jewish Colonel Max Friedman Certifies an Enlistment into the Cameron Dragoons

Document Signed

1 page

SMC 166

Jewish Colonel Max Friedman Certifies the enlistment of Joshua Pickering into the Cameron Dragoons, a largely Jewish regiment.
Add to History Board Share
Union Soldier After Gettysburg:

Autograph Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 168

A letter from a Union soldier to his family after the battle of Gettysburg. He lists missing soldiers, and reports the numbers of dead, wounded, and missing.
Add to History Board Share
Jewish Confederates: Letter Regarding Benjamin Mordecai's Support of a Commission for Jacob Valentine

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 181

The secretary to the governor of South Carolina assures Charleston native Benjamin Mordecai that Jacob Valentine would be considered for a commission in service to the state. Mordecai had made possible South Carolina's secession from the Union with a generous donation.
Add to History Board Share
David Ben-Gurion on Eisenhower:

Autograph Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 189

David Ben-Gurion recalls Dwight D. Eisenhower as a "lovely person," who wanted to help the Jews immediately after World War II, but was prevented from doing so by the British Foreign Office and the American State Department.
Add to History Board Share
General Meade: Lee is Just 15 Miles Away and

Autograph Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 190

Add to History Board Share
Abraham Lincoln Endorses the Appointment of a Jewish Sutler, Henry Rice

Autograph Note Signed

1 page

SMC 193

Abraham Lincoln endorses General Alexander McClernand's pick for the position of sutler (a civilian merchant who sells goods to the army), Henry Rice.
Add to History Board Share
Abraham Lincoln Queries the Surgeon General of the Army About an Appointment

Autograph Endorsement Signed

1 page

SMC 209

Lincoln asks William Alexander Hammond, the Surgeon General of the Union Army if a Mr. Bushnell should be appointed. Hammond replies in the affirmative, as there is a place for Bushnell at Louisville.
Add to History Board Share
Three Days Before He is Assassinated, Abraham Lincoln Orders the Discharge of a Sickly Boy from the Army

Autograph Note Signed

4 pages

SMC 211

Three days before he will be shot and killed, Lincoln responds to a friend’s letter beseeching his help in arranging the discharge of a sickly boy from the army.
Add to History Board Share
Praising the United Jewish Appeal, FDR Mentions Suffering Brought on by the Nazis

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 249

President Franklin D. Roosevelt writes a bland letter to the chairmen of the United Jewish Appeal, in which he scratches the surface of the Holocaust and rather hollowly endorses the UJA.
Add to History Board Share
Alexander Hart's Civil War Sword and Scabbard, Presented Upon His Promotion to Captain

Historical artifacts

3 pages

SMC 255

Sword and Scabbard of Alexander Hart, a religious Jewish haberdasher who led the 5th Louisiana Infantry.
Add to History Board Share
William Tecumseh Sherman Vents Anti-Semitic Prejudices, Discusses Runaway Slaves, & Sketches Total War

Autograph Letter Signed

4 pages

SMC 259

Writing during the war, Sherman casually blames smuggling and theft on Jews. Additionally, he depicts the hatred of the Southern population towards the North, justifying, presumably, his harsh conduct of war.
Add to History Board Share
General Custer Gives an Order to His Loyal Adjutant Cooke, Who Would Die Next to Him at Little Bighorn

Autograph Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 289

This order to Cooke concerns another 7th Cavalry regular who also rode with Custer – though not as a friend. Major Lewis Merrill, with whom Custer had numerous run-ins, is alleged here to have taken some instruments belonging to the 7th Cavalry band: Cooke is tasked with making sense of what happened.
Add to History Board Share
Prime Minister Winston Churchill on Orde Wingate: A Man of Genius Who Might Have Become a Man of Destiny

Autograph Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 293

On his way to the second Quebec conference, Winston Churchill remembers that a year ago, he, Orde, and Lorna Wingate were on their way to the first conference. Churchill offers his condolences to the newly-widowed Lorna.
Add to History Board Share
Winston Churchill Thanks Ormsby-Gore for Accepting Post to the Permanent Mandates Commission

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 294

Winston Churchill Thanks Pro-Zionist Ormsby-Gore for Accepting Post to the Permanent Mandates Commission Responsible for Palestine.
Add to History Board Share
Letter From Gettysburg Battlefield, July 4th, 1863: Union Soldier Hopes

Autograph Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 299

Writing to his mother on the fourth of July, Private Strouss tells his her that he is alive, unharmed, and although unsure who has won, he hopes that "this Battle will end the war" so that he may return home.
Add to History Board Share
David Ben Gurion Predicts That the Six Day War Will Not Be Israel's Last

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 302

Ben-Gurion claims that as long as the USA and the USSR fight the Cold War by proxy in the Middle East - by arming Arab countries - there will be no peace in the region, and Israel will have to continuously fight for its survival.
Add to History Board Share
Custer's Aide, Frederick Benteen, Takes the Oath of Office as Captain in the 7th Calvary

Document Signed

2 pages

SMC 303

Here Benteen, infamous for coming to Custer's aide too slowly at the Battle of Little Bighorn, steps into history, taking the Oath of Office as Captain in the 7th Cavalry.
Add to History Board Share
Dr. Jacob de Silva Solis Cohen: A Scarce Civil War Autograph

Document Signed

1 page

SMC 307

Promotion of war hero Lt. Commander James Kelsey Cogswell to Commander; signed by William McKinley on the first day of his second term as president.
Add to History Board Share
Jewish General Edward S. Salomon Accepts an Invitation to Meet With His Old Comrades-in-Arms

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 308

Edward S. Salomon was a hero of Gettysburg and Atlanta, rising through the ranks and eventually becoming a Brigadier General. He commanded a Jewish regiment, the 82nd Illinois, and here accepts an invitation "to meet the officers of the late Army of the Cumberland."
Add to History Board Share
In 1936, As Hitler Closes In, Freud Acts to Help a Colleague's Son Who Has Been Charged With High Treason

Autograph Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 314

Sigmund Freud writes to support his friend Paul Federn, whose anti-fascist son has been arrested for the second time for high treason in Austria. Freud had previously lent his friend 3000 francs and insists that he accept the additional 2000 enclosed in the letter.
Add to History Board Share
In 1942, Ensign J.F. Kennedy Requests Sea Duty on a PT Vessel:

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 343

This document sent John F. Kennedy to sea during World War II, where he would become a celebrated hero after his boat sunk, and he swam three miles to shore dragging a shipmate to safety with his lifejacket between his teeth.
Add to History Board Share
President Kennedy Sends General Maxwell Taylor to South Vietnam to Appraise the Situation

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 344

Under pressure to send US ground troops to Vietnam, President John F. Kennedy plays for time by sending General Maxwell Taylor to South Vietnam to appraise the situation. Kennedy reminds Taylor that the "initial responsibility for the effective maintenance of the independence of South Viet-Nam rests with the people and government of that country."
Add to History Board Share

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 347

Lincoln's Secretary of War, Edwin Stanton, pleaded with Lincoln not to go to Petersburg because of great personal risk to the President. Lincoln responds that he had already been to Petersburg with Grant, and plans to go to Richmond, newly fallen, as well. He assures Stanton that he will take care of himself.
Add to History Board Share

Autograph Letter Signed

3 pages

SMC 349

A subscriber of Leeser's periodical The Occident beseeches the publicly neutral Leeser to intervene with President Lincoln in order to end the Civil War.
Add to History Board Share
Abraham Lincoln: A December 8 Oath of Allegiance

Autograph Document Signed

1 page

SMC 352

The Oath of December 8 was announced by Lincoln, on that day, in his annual message to congress in 1863. He would offer a pardon to any man who would swear, without coercion, his allegiance to the Union.
Add to History Board Share
President Harry Truman Defends Atomic Bombing of Japan as

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 367

Harry Truman defends his use of the atomic bomb, reasoning that the only language the Japanese understand is that of extreme force.
Add to History Board Share
Theodore Roosevelt on the sinking of the Lusitania

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 1278

Theodore Roosevelt resented Woodrow Wilson's weak position on German naval aggression. Here, he unequivocally states that had Wilson shown some strong leadership and stood up to Germany, over 1000 civilians would not have lost their lives at sea.
Add to History Board Share
Woodrow Wilson Lobbies for Ratification of the Treaty of Versailles - A Matter of Gravest Consequence

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 1313

This letter is an example of Woodrow Wilson's attempt to court Republican senators to ratify the Treaty of Versailles, of which he was one of the chief negotiators; Congress refused to ratify it.
Add to History Board Share
Woodrow Wilson on How the Bodies of America's WWI Dead Are Handled Prior to Eventual Re-Burial in the US

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 1320

President Woodrow Wilson explains the process by which every fallen soldier is tagged and temporarily buried until their bodies can be brought to their final resting place in the United States.
Add to History Board Share
Woodrow Wilson on the Emotional Impact WWI Has Had on Him - Which Led to His Devastating Stroke

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 1321

Woodrow Wilson confides that he doesn't read anything pertaining to World War One that "renews too deeply the emotions of wartime," as he is "too much affected and too upset by it."
Add to History Board Share
President Franklin D. Roosevelt Fires His Isolationist Secretary of War During WWII

Autograph Letter Signed

3 pages

SMC 1373

After forgiving his old and dear friend many missteps, Franklin Roosevelt finally fires Harry Woodring as Secretary of War.
Add to History Board Share
FDR Assures Fired, and Fired Up, Isolationist Secretary of War: No War Unless Monroe Doctrine is Breached

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 1376

President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, having just fired his Secretary of War, Harry Woodring, responds jovially to the latter's resignation letter. Roosevelt assures Woodring that the United States will maintain a non-interventionist policy with regards to World War II.
Add to History Board Share
He's

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 1406

Truman initially regarded Kennedy as as young, inexperienced, and up for office because his father bought him the vote. Here, Truman supports Kennedy's handling of the Berlin crisis, which saw the city divided between the Soviet Union and the Western Allies. Rather than seeing Kennedy's actions as weak, he praised the President's leadership in buying time with the Soviets in order to retain control of half the city.
Add to History Board Share
A Ronald Reagan Photo in Front of the Berlin Wall, Inscribed With

Signed Photograph

1 page

SMC 1471

Autograph quote from Ronald Reagan on a photo of him in front of the Berlin Wall near the Brandenburg gate. The famous "Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!"
Add to History Board Share
Ronald Reagan Writes About Vietnam in 1968: A Change of Policy is Needed

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 1476

Ronald Reagan's draft of a letter to a Vietnam serviceman expressing his gratitude for his and other soldiers' service. Reagan calls for both a policy and leadership change, alluding to Johnson's handling of the war.
Add to History Board Share
Lincoln Asks General Grant as a Friend, for a Favor: Find a Place for His Son, Robert, on His Staff

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 1548

In order to broker a compromise between his wife, who had already buried two sons, and Robert Todd, who desperately wished to experience the war, Lincoln writes to Grant, not as President, but as a friend, asking him to find a place on his staff for Robert to serve. Lincoln asks merely for his son to be given a nominal rank and that Lincoln himself, and not the public, would furnish his necessary means.
Add to History Board Share
Lincoln is

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 1554

After just having heard that the union lost 1776 men in the Battle of the Wilderness, amongst other bad news, Lincoln was asked to give a sentiment for an autograph collector, Lincoln replied "I would give a sentiment, but just now I am not in a sentimental mood."
Add to History Board Share
Secretary of Interior on Campaign to Stop German Annihilation of Jews -The Holocaust- During WWII

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 1616

Letter from the Secretary of the Interior of the United States, inviting friends to join a campaign to end the German annihilation of the Jews of Europe.
Add to History Board Share
Jewish Confederate Hero Alexander Hart Grants Leave to Officers During a Brief Lull in the Civil War

Document Signed

2 pages

SMC 1642

Alexander Hart, a storied and battle-proven Major in the Provisional Army of the Confederate States, directs and signs off on thirty-day leaves for officers.
Add to History Board Share
President Herbert Hoover, on the Lessons to be Drawn from Abraham Lincoln's Life

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 1654

President Herbert Hoover, addressing a Lincoln biographer, suggests that Lincoln's greatness was not in winning a war, but in his conduct and attitude in victory.
Add to History Board Share
Millard Fillmore on Civil War: Abolitionists Pervert Cause and Lincoln Tempts Tyranny

Autograph Letter Signed

3 pages

SMC 1767

Millard Fillmore accuses abolitionists of "destroying the Constitution" and attempting to "prevent a reunion of the states," in addition to "perverting this war into a war for emancipation."
Add to History Board Share
Signed Photo of Edmund Allenby Entering Jerusalem

Signed Photograph

1 page

SMC 1772

In direct contrast to Kaiser Wilhelm II's entrance to Jerusalem on horseback, Edmund Allenby respectfully dismounted before entering the Holy City. He was the first Christian to rule Jerusalem in centuries.
Add to History Board Share
Einstein on the Holocaust: He Never Forgot, Never Forgave

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 1782

Einstein declines an invitation to join Weltstaatliga (World State League), explaining that he can no longer participate in German public endeavors after the genocide of the Jews.
Add to History Board Share
Albert Einstein Renounces German Citizenship;

Autograph Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 1792

Albert Einstein writes to his son from aboard the Belgenland, where he has learned that Hitler had given orders to ransack not only his Berlin apartment, but also his summer cottage. He decides whilst onboard to renounce his German citizenship, and tells his son that he will likely never return to Germany again.
Add to History Board Share
Abraham Lincoln Exercises Clemency:

Autograph Endorsement Signed

1 page

SMC 1811

Abraham Lincoln directs the release of "this boy" who had enlisted in the Union Army and received the standard bonus. Whether the boy was underage, AWOL, or a bounty-jumper(one of many who signed up for the enlistment bonus and then deserted) is unknown.
Add to History Board Share
Theodore Roosevelt Lambasts Woodrow Wilson for Refusing to Let Him Lead a Division in World War I

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 2022

Fifty-nine year old, arthritic, overweight Theodore Roosevelt lambasts President Woodrow Wilson for refusing to allow him to lead a division in World War I, calling it Wilson's inability to "rise above the cheapest kind of party politics."
Add to History Board Share
Chaim Weizmann to Lorna Wingate on the Jewish Brigade:

Autograph Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 375

Chaim Weizmann tells Lorna Wingate that the Jewish Brigade, and future army, is a long game, and will come with hard work and fortitude.
Add to History Board Share
Chaim Weizmann in 1943:

Autograph Letter Signed

3 pages

SMC 376

Writing during World War Two, Chaim Weizmann assures Lorna Wingate that her husband Orde is on the mend after a bout of typhoid. In the interim, he comments that many things are happening in Palestine that would provoke the British, though he hopes they will not allow themselves to be provoked. It would be "nothing short of a miracle if we do get something out of this war," he ruefully remarks.
Add to History Board Share
Chaim Weizmann Agrees to Stand as Godfather to Orde Wingate's Son

Autograph Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 378

Chaim Weizmann agrees to stand as Godfather to the son of Major General Orde Wingate, Orde Jonathan Wingate.
Add to History Board Share
Chaim Weizmann on the Jewish Brigade and Jewish State in 1944

Autograph Letter Signed

3 pages

SMC 379

Chaim Weizmann writes to Lorna Wingate, the widow of Major-General Orde Wingate, to tell her that the British government finally approved the creation of the Jewish Brigade. Weizmann's feelings are mixed, though, as Wingate - who died five months earlier - would have made this Brigade "a powerful force."
Add to History Board Share
Ben-Gurion Predicts Victory Under Dayan in 6-Day War; Discusses How Many Arabs Equal One Israeli Soldier

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 385

Moshe Dayan is appointed minister of defence; Ben Gurion predicts that Israel will triumph over Egypt, Jordan, and Syria in the coming Six Day War.
Add to History Board Share
Eisenhower's Trip to Ohrdruf Concentration Camp:

Autograph Letter Signed

3 pages

SMC 393

General Eisenhower writes to his wife, after seeing the Ohrdruf concentration camp, that he never dreamt that such cruelty could exist in this world. Poignantly, he mentions that many American soldiers do not seem to know what they are fighting for. Eisenhower ordered every unit not on the front lines to tour the camp, and writes here "now, at least, he will know what he is fighting against."
Add to History Board Share
Rare, Seemingly Singular Evidence, That John F. Kennedy Knew How to Fly: His 1944 Flight Logbook

Signed Book

3 pages

SMC 2074

John F. Kennedy's flight logbook of 1944, in which he took ten solo lessons. No existent documentation exists to explain Kennedy's choice; an odd one, as just that year, he discouraged his brother Bobby from flying, and was growing increasingly anxious about the number of fatalities in his older brother Joe's aviation unit. Joe would be shot down later that year in a secret mission over France.
Add to History Board Share
General Benjamin Butler: The Jews

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 2182

General Butler, discussing the arrest of two Jewish blockade-runners, displays his notorious anti-Semitism.
Add to History Board Share
Civil War 25-Cent Sutler Token From L. Goldheim of J.E.B Stuart's 1st Virginia Cavalry

Historical artifacts

1 page

SMC 2234

Lazarus Goldheim 25-cent token: Goldheim, hailing from Baltimore, was the sutler for the 1st Virginia Cavalry, one of the Confederacy's most celebrated fighting units.
Add to History Board Share
More Results