Hundreds of Historic Manuscripts. Thousands More Being Digitized.

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Topic

Human Aspect

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    Manuscripts (58)

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    Following His Resignation, Former Secretary of War Woodring Writes A Curt Rebuttal To Roosevelt

    Autograph Note Signed

    1 page

    SMC 1379

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    Secretary of War Woodring's Handwritten Draft of His Controversial Resignation Letter to FDR

    Autograph Manuscript

    2 pages

    SMC 1361

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    Young John F. Kennedy Condemns Harry Truman's Reversal to Support the Partition of Palestine

    Autograph Manuscript

    2 pages

    SMC 149

    At a dinner of Jewish veterans, John F. Kennedy, then a congressman from Massachusetts, condemns Harry Truman's withdrawal of support for the partition of Palestine as "one of the most unfortunate reversals in American policy. Kennedy also called for the US to lift the arms embargo in order to give Israel a chance to protect herself in the ensuing war.
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    Quintessential Reagan Speech: He's Sick About RFK's Assassination, About Lawlessness, About Blame

    Typed Manuscript

    19 pages

    SMC 163

    Ronald Reagan, speaking here after weeks of unrest at university campuses, the slaying of policemen, and finally, the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy, takes the current leadership to task for allowing the country to be torn apart.
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    Robert Frost Declares Himself a

    Autograph Manuscript Signed

    1 page

    SMC 167

    Robert Frost expresses his identification with, and friendship for, the "brave… little" nation of Israel. He also recommends reading the story of Nehemiah, possibly as a prelude to the modern-day restoration of the Jews to Israel.
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    Extraordinary Eyewitness Account of the Assassination of President McKinley-Dated One Day After

    Typed Manuscript Signed

    8 pages

    SMC 183

    De Benneville Randolph Keim, a Washington reporter, was standing right by McKinley when he was assassinated. He took an active role in responding, including carrying the mortally wounded president to an ambulance. This is his account of the assassination.
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    Abraham Lincoln Endorses the Appointment of a Jewish Sutler, Henry Rice

    Autograph Note Signed

    1 page

    SMC 193

    Abraham Lincoln endorses General Alexander McClernand's pick for the position of sutler (a civilian merchant who sells goods to the army), Henry Rice.
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    Three Days Before He is Assassinated, Abraham Lincoln Orders the Discharge of a Sickly Boy from the Army

    Autograph Note Signed

    4 pages

    SMC 211

    Three days before he will be shot and killed, Lincoln responds to a friend’s letter beseeching his help in arranging the discharge of a sickly boy from the army.
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    Abraham Lincoln

    Autograph Note Signed

    1 page

    SMC 212

    On his last birthday, Abraham Lincoln pardons mischievous schoolboys, allowing them to return to school on condition that they do not misbehave.
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    Theodore Roosevelt: Famous

    Autograph Quotation Signed

    1 page

    SMC 252

    Autographed quotation of famous "square deal" with accompanying letter to Richard Lee Fern. The square deal was Roosevelt's call for equal opportunities for every man and woman in the United States. Equality politically, socially, and in "matters industrial."
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    A Secret Service Agent's Account of the Reagan Assassination Attempt, Signed by Reagan

    Autograph Sentiment Signed

    4 pages

    SMC 257

    Jerry Parr, who is credited with saving Ronald Reagan's life, gives his account of the assassination attempt. Everything that happened in the three seconds between the first pop of gunfire to the door of the presidential limo slamming shut, is broken down into slow-motion, from the moment Reagan leaves for his luncheon at the Washington Hilton, to his remarks prior to entering surgery.
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    Famous Mark Twain Aphorism About Deserving Honors

    Autograph Quotation Signed

    2 pages

    SMC 284

    Mark Twain signs the back of a menu for the The Willard Hotel in January of 1906. The aphorism: "On the whole, it is better to deserve honors & not have them, than to have them & not deserve them."
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    Frederick Douglass Quotes Abraham Lincoln:

    Autograph Quotation Signed

    1 page

    SMC 296

    Frederick Douglass, who was asked by Abraham Lincoln himself what Douglas thought of his second inaugural speech, here autographs the famous Lincolnian quotation from that address.
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    Herbert Hoover's Handwritten List of His Autograph Collection

    Autograph Note

    5 pages

    SMC 329

    Herbert Hoover knew the value of his handwritten letters, as he himself was a collector of autographs. Amongst his collection was Mark Twain, Queen Victoria, and, most valuable, according to Hoover, a letter of Bayard Taylor – the poet, travel writer, and great chronicler of Palestine and the Levant.
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    President Taft's Eulogy for his Aide, Archibald Butt, Who Went Down with the Titanic Just Days Before

    Typed Manuscript Signed

    1 page

    SMC 366

    President Taft mourns his aide and friend Archibald Butt, who went down on the Titanic. Butt was a gentleman and a soldier, and, Taft is certain, would have gallantly gone down with the ship, after seeing to the rescue of others. Butt was last seen standing on the sinking deck with John Jacob Astor.
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    Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address Transcript & With Malice Toward None Quote in Autograph

    Autograph Quotation Signed

    1 page

    SMC 401

    Lincoln writes and autographs the famous "with malice towards none" paragraph from his second inaugural address.
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    Abraham Lincoln on Issachar Zacharie, His Mysterious Jewish Foot Doctor and Personal Spy

    Autograph Manuscript Signed

    1 page

    SMC 407

    Here, Lincoln describes Issachar Zacharie's removal of corns from the President's feet in order to alleviate "what plain people call back-ache." The two would meet frequently, though not for medical reasons. Zacharie served as a spie, and provided the President with valuable information about various aspects of the Confederacy.
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    Abraham Lincoln Swears That He Shall Not Retract or Modify the Emancipation Proclamation

    Autograph Quotation Signed

    1 page

    SMC 455

    At the request of Henry C. Wright of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society, Lincoln vows to not retract or modify the Emancipation Proclamation.
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    Emile Zola Writes to Alfred Dreyfus at the Height of the Dreyfus Affair

    Autograph Note Signed

    1 page

    SMC 509

    Emile Zola's calling card, asking Alfred Dreyfus to send him a document which he has asked Zola to sign.
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    Alfred Dreyfus Writes to Emile Zola's Widow to Commemorate the Anniversary of the Publication of

    Autograph Note Signed

    1 page

    SMC 510

    Eight years after Emile Zola has died, Alfred Dreyfus continues to expresses his gratitude to Alexandrine Zola, Emile Zola's widow, on the twelfth anniversary of the publication of "J'Accuse."
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    Alfred Dreyfus Thanks Senator Leopold Thezard Who Challenged the Refusal to Allow His Wife to Join Him in Exile

    Autograph Note Signed

    1 page

    SMC 512

    Alfred Dreyfus thanks French Senator, Leopold Thezard, who was also a professor of law at Poitiers University, for his support. Thezard argued against the illegality of the French government to deny Lucie Dreyfus the right to join her husband in exile.
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    Lincoln Would be Glad to See General Milroy but knows

    Autograph Note Signed

    1 page

    SMC 570

    Abraham Lincoln gracefully sidesteps a meeting with the problematic General Milroy, who was arrested for losing half of his troops. Milroy railed against his superiors, who jailed him for his actions, and continuously pestered Lincoln for his release and restoration to command.
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    The Day He Dies, Lincoln Writes a Pass to Richmond for Wife of the Doctor Who Would Attend His Death-Bed

    Autograph Note Signed

    1 page

    SMC 575

    Lincoln issues a pass for Mrs. Alice Stone to travel to Richmond; by that night her husband, the Lincoln family physician, would be attending at Lincoln’s deathbed.
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    A Historic Memo: Harry Truman Salutes Dean Acheson's Crucial Role in Going to War With Korea

    Autograph Note Signed

    2 pages

    SMC 685

    President Harry Truman commends Dean Acheson as Secretary of State for superbly handling events leading up to the Korean War.
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    Two Days After Unleashing a Tempest by Firing MacArthur, President Truman Writes to a Journalist

    Autograph Note Signed

    1 page

    SMC 699

    President Truman writes to Merriman Smith, perhaps in response to something Smith had said to the President, a prediction, seemingly, about the great news of the day – Truman’s firing of MacArthur two days before – that inspired this note, with which Truman apparently forwarded “an interesting piece” he had run across in his hometown paper.
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    General Eisenhower Approves a Soldier's Request to Shoot Captured Reich Marshal Goering -

    Autograph Note Signed

    1 page

    SMC 702

    Eisenhower had ordered every soldier not on the front to tour a concentration camp in order to understand not only the magnitude of the Holocaust, but the enemy itself. As a result, one soldier put in a request to shoot Hermann Goering, if he was indeed to be shot. Goering was sentenced to death by hanging, but took his own life in his cell. Here, Eisenhower refers to the corpulent Goering as "that fat ___"
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    Notes Written by President John F. Kennedy Aboard Air Force One

    Autograph Note

    7 pages

    SMC 711

    These notes, written by President Kennedy aboard Air Force One illustrate how the most important world events, like our mundane tasks, often begin with the same shorthand scrawlings.
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    Max Nordau's Calling Card Bearing an Autograph Note

    Autograph Note

    1 page

    SMC 744

    Max Nordau expresses his gratitude for "an interesting article.
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    Max Nordau Sends New Years Greetings to Viennese Writer and Translator Paul Tausig

    Autograph Note

    1 page

    SMC 745

    Max Nordau sends New Year's greetings on his own calling card to the Viennese writer and translator Paul Tausig.
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    President John F. Kennedy

    Autograph Note Signed

    1 page

    SMC 901

    John F. Kennedy signs a quote to the photographer, who had recently captured him "on the edge of the new frontier."
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    Manuscript from Mark Twain's Missing 1867 Notebook, Announcing His Intention to Travel Abroad

    Autograph Note

    2 pages

    SMC 911

    In this leaf from one of Mark Twain's missing notebooks, the young author writes of his upcoming journey to Europe and the Levant. Twain would chronicle the trip in The Innocents Abroad, a book that which would launch his career as a writer.
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    President William McKinley Wires Ailing Vice President Garret Hobart

    Autograph Telegram Signed

    1 page

    SMC 917

    Immediately after returning to Washington from visiting the ailing Garret Hobart in New Jersey, McKinley wires him to inquire after his health. Less than three months later, heart disease would finally claim Hobart's life.
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    Autograph Note

    2 pages

    SMC 955

    President John Tyler accepts an engagement on the condition that no presidential duties get in the way. Since he ascended the presidency merely upon the death of President William Henry Harrison, he was referred to by his detractors as "His Accidency." Here Tyler demonstrates his sense of humor and refers to himself as "an accident," explaining that things might occur which would cause him to break the engagement.
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    1858 Senate Report Regarding the

    Typed Manuscript

    30 pages

    SMC 1012

    The 1858 Senate report, which details the murder and rape of the Dickson family in their agricultural colony. The author, Jonathan Steinbeck was a descendent of members of the colony, and the "Outrages at Jaffa" is alluded to in his East of Eden. Herman Melville, inspired by the tragic events, wrote his epic poem Clarel.
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    Lincoln, Four Days After Son Willie's Death, Tells Sumner Mary Lincoln Needs His Help -

    Autograph Note Signed

    1 page

    SMC 1034

    Four days after the death of his eleven year-old son Willie - and as his youngest son still lay seriously ill - a grieving Lincoln asks Mary Lincoln's close friend, Senator Charles Sumner, to call on his inconsolable wife.
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    Lincoln Interjects Himself Into a Case of Two Jewish Merchants Charged With Selling Goods to Blockaders

    Autograph Note Signed

    1 page

    SMC 1038

    Meyer and Philip Wallach were Jewish brothers who were charged with selling goods to blockaders and were held at an infamous prison for Confederate officers. Here, President Lincoln protects them by ordering the head of the prison to keep them in his custody - to neither send them away or allow them to be transferred.
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    A Handsome Autograph Sentiment from Millard Fillmore as President

    Autograph Sentiment Signed

    1 page

    SMC 1068

    Autograph from Millard Fillmore to an unknown recipient, Washington, February 20, 1851. The day after he delivered to Congress his report on the Fugitive Slave Law crisis.
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    Manuscript of Vachel Lindsay's

    Typed Manuscript Signed

    4 pages

    SMC 1111

    Manuscript of Vachel Lindsay's "Abraham Lincoln Walks at Midnight" with an early letter from the poet to the Springfield Art Society. Lindsay had conceived of the idea to have a contest in order to design a flag for the city of Springfield. However, he makes it clear in this letter that he wants to have "no hand in the matter."
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    Physician of Assassinated President William McKinley Quotes McKinley's Last Words

    Autograph Note Signed

    1 page

    SMC 1182

    Matthew D. Mann, the physician who tended to President William McKinley on his deathbed, confirms McKinley's fabled last words.
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    President Rutherford B. Hayes Quotes Abraham Lincoln on Equal Opportunities for All

    Autograph Quotation Signed

    1 page

    SMC 1202

    President Rutherford B. Hayes quotes Abraham Lincoln, calling for all to have "an equal start and a fair chance in the race of life."
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    Mark Twain's Mockup of Title Page and Dedication of

    Autograph Manuscript Signed

    2 pages

    SMC 119

    Mark Twain's handwritten mockup of the title page and dedication of More Tramps Abroad with a note about Innocents Abroad.
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    As Lee Surrenders, Abraham Lincoln Happily Grants a Favor to the Captain of the Riverboat Queen

    Autograph Note Signed

    1 page

    SMC 123

    The only surviving Lincoln letter from April 9th, 1865, the day that Lee surrendered the Confederate Army of North Virginia to Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant at the home of Wilmer and Virginia McLean in the town of Appomattox Court House, Virginia. Written aboard the "River Queen" on the Potomac, President Lincoln grants a favor to the steamboat's Captain Bradford.
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    Mark Twain's Autograph Notes Regarding People, Places, and Recalling an Incident

    Autograph Note

    6 pages

    SMC 125

    Mark Twain's notes from 1907, in two sections. One, in the manner of a questionnaire, matches names to places (Joe Goodman's, for instance, with "San Francisco, and Alameda") and indicates where Clemens had not been (Los Angeles & Palmyra); the other section mostly concerns an incident, and includes dialogue.
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    John F. Kennedy's

    Typed Manuscript

    20 pages

    SMC 1449

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    Both Parties Deprecated War: Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address Quote, In Autograph

    Autograph Quotation Signed

    1 page

    SMC 1551

    Lincoln writes and autographs the famous "both sides deprecated war" passage from his second inaugural address.
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    Lincoln Card:

    Autograph Note Signed

    1 page

    SMC 1602

    A Lincoln card, submitted to his Secretary of War, Edwin Stanton on April 20, 1863. This was a busy day for Lincoln, as he was dealing with admitting West Virginia into the Union, fighting in many southern states, and a large force patrolling central Tennessee. This is a small portion of what Lincoln had on his desk that day, and any number of these issues could have concerned Stanton.
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    Mark Twain Directs His Publisher to Set Two Lines of Text in Facsimile, Not Typeface

    Autograph Note Signed

    1 page

    SMC 1617

    A brief note regarding composition from Mark Twain, directing either Elisha or Frank Bliss to set something up in facsimile rather than type.
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    Herbert Hoover Describes Himself

    Autograph Sentiment Signed

    1 page

    SMC 1657

    In this autographed sentiment signed, Herbert Hoover describes himself as "once of Washington D.C., now, fortunately elsewhere."
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    From

    Autograph Quotation Signed

    1 page

    SMC 1682

    Mark Twain's handwritten irreverent soliloquy from the Tomb of Adam in the Holy Land from Innocents Abroad.
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    Mark Twain Excoriates Theodore Roosevelt as a Butcher, a Ruffian and a Bully

    Autograph Manuscript

    4 pages

    SMC 1706

    In an unpublished article, Mark Twain excoriates Theodore Roosevelt for bullying a fifteen-year-old girl and for promoting a man who, it was well known, was "brutal" to a woman in a waiting room.
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    Abraham Lincoln’s Final Hours, Death, and Autopsy Report Documented by Dr. Robert Stone

    Autograph Manuscript

    7 pages

    SMC 1844

    An account of Lincoln's death, written by his personal physician, Dr. Robert K. Stone. This seven-page narrative details Dr. Stone’s dramatic rush to the stricken president’s side, and, some eight hours later, Lincoln’s final minutes, decline, death, and autopsy. The report is stained with human blood; it is, very likely, Lincoln’s.
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    Lincoln's Second Testimonial for Issachar Zacharie, His Mysterious Jewish Chiropodist - And Personal Spy

    Autograph Testimonial Signed

    1 page

    SMC 1906

    In the midst of a hectic schedule, President Lincoln finds the time to endorse Issachar Zacharie, his Jewish chiropodist and spy: the same week as the bloody Battle of Antietam, and the same day Lincoln read his Emancipation Proclamation to his cabinet.
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    Rabbi Isaac Leeser's Review of Convert and Early American Zionist Warder Cresson's

    Autograph Manuscript

    4 pages

    SMC 1921

    Rabbi Isaac Leeser reviews the American Zionist Warder Cresson's book The Key of David. Leeser explictly states that he does not "wish to be considered as endorsing all Mr. C. advances." Nor does he regularly read his work. However, he continues, it makes for enjoyable reading to those who are "fond of high-seasoned polemical writings."
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    Lincoln Requests a

    Autograph Note Signed

    1 page

    SMC 2038

    Lincoln, who always liked to give his son Tad special gifts, asks here for two maps for his son.
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    What's in a Name: Samuel Clemens Defines Mark Twain

    Autograph Note Signed

    2 pages

    SMC 2117

    Samuel Clemens explains his nom de plume as originating as a navigational term along the Mississippi. "Mark Twain" signified a depth sounding of two fathoms, and was called out by the leadsman; it was a term Twain, having served as a riverboat captain, would have heard daily.
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    A Leaf from Abraham Lincoln's Earliest Handwritten Manuscript, His Homemade Student

    Autograph Manuscript Signed

    1 page

    SMC 2233

    His education, Lincoln said, was deficient: it lasted, formally, but a year. At 16 years old, Lincoln created a personal notebook, known then as a sum book. Here, amid arithmetical calculations, he also writes a piece of doggerel, daydreaming about his future.
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