Custer: "Libbie Bacon is the Fortunate, or Unfortunate Person...Who Will Unite Her Destinies With Mine."

December 19, 1863

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Custer: "Libbie Bacon is the Fortunate, or Unfortunate Person...Who Will Unite Her Destinies With Mine."
Autograph Letter Signed
3 pages | SMC 126

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      Custer announces his forthcoming marriage, and asks that it be kept secret. “Libbie Bacon is the fortunate or unfortunate person, whichever it will be, who will unite her destinies with mine."  He asks his close friend Judge Christiancy to be present at the evening ceremony, after which the newlyweds will decamp on the midnight train.  Christiancy’s son, Jim, will also be coming home with Custer to the wedding, and Custer is gratified to report that the hard-drinking rake has “almost” forsworn drink. There is no news of importance to impart, Custer adds: he doubts that Meade will be removed.


      Autograph Letter Signed ("G.A. Custer), 3 pages, octavo, Headquarters 3rd Division, C.C., December 19, 1863. To "My Dear Friend," Judge Christiancy
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      Headquarters 3rd Div, C.C.
      Dec 19th, 1863

      My Dear Friend,

      Circumstances unlooked for, will prevent me from visiting Monroe for a few weeks.  I expect to be in Monroe in Feb. And now I will entrust you with a secret which I have communicated to no one except my own family and desire you to retainn it.  I am coming home in February for the purpose of getting married. Libbie Bacon is the fortunate or unfortunate person, whichever it will be, who will unite her destinies with mine.  I hope it will 

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      be convenient for you to be present at the ceremony, which will take place in the evening.  We will leave Monroe on the 12 o'clock train the same night. Let me here repeat my request for you to retain this little item of news to yourself.

      Jim [Lt. Jim Christiancy] will accompany me home, as will most of the members of my staff. By the way, Jim has consented to transfer his pay accounts for the coming six months to me and is only to expect the amount of money I see fit to let him have, he has also almost consented to discard the use of  

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      whiskey, brandy and the other stronger drinks.

      This is certainly something to produce gratification on my part - as well as yours. No news of importance. I doubt very much if Meade is removed. Write to me at your earliest convenience.

      Your Sincere friend,
      G.A. Custer