Theodore Roosevelt Original Historic Letters and Documents

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Topic

Human Aspect

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Manuscripts (37)

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Despite Being Shot, Theodore Roosevelt is, Reportedly,

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 177

Ebert Martin, Theodore Roosevelt's assistant, jumped on Roosevelt's would-be-assassin and wrestled him to the ground. Here he reports from Roosevelt's hospital room that the candidate is improving.
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Theodore Roosevelt Confidently Reports that the Mortally Wounded President McKinley is Doing Well

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 245

Roosevelt feels assured not only that McKinley will recover, but that his recovery will be so speedy that in a very short time he will be able to resume his duties.
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Days After William McKinley's Death, Theodore Roosevelt Swears to Do His Best

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 251

Roosevelt, who has just become President due to McKinley's assassination looks forward at what must be done, rather than being "morbid."
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Theodore Roosevelt: Famous

Autograph Quotation Signed

1 page

SMC 252

Autographed quotation of famous "square deal" with accompanying letter to Richard Lee Fern. The square deal was Roosevelt's call for equal opportunities for every man and woman in the United States. Equality politically, socially, and in "matters industrial."
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President Theodore Roosevelt Plans for Life After the White House: His African Safari

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 253

Theodore Roosevelt, in the midst of planning his post-presidential safari, asks a fellow big-game hunter currently residing in East Africa for recommendations of hunting spots for specific animals.
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Theodore Roosevelt Comments On, and Then Annotates, a Manuscript Detailing the Attempt Made on His Life

Typed Letter Signed

5 pages

SMC 258

Theodore Roosevelt comments on a manuscript detailing, step by step and minute by minute, the assassination attempt made on his life on October 14, 1912.
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Theodore Roosevelt Expresses His Dislike of the Motor Car

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 423

Though he was the first president to ride in an automobile, President Theodore Roosevelt had a profound dislike for them. He does, concede, however, that once their use is regulated, they will likely be less objectionable.
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Theodore Roosevelt Arranges a Dramatic Presentation About the Rough Riders

Typed Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 424

Roosevelt arranges to meet Mason Mitchell, whom he deems "the only Rough Rider with dramatic and literary capacity," in order to discuss their dramatic presentation about the Rough Riders.
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30-Year-Old Theodore Roosevelt Declares His Affinity for the West, and His Identification with its Heroes

Autograph Letter Signed

3 pages

SMC 464

Researching his history about the conquest of the North American frontier, Roosevelt writes to the president of the Tennessee Historical Society, declaring his affinity for, and identification with, such great Tennesseans as John Sevier, Isaac Shelby, William Clark, Daniel Boone, Davy Crockett and Sam Houston.
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Theodore Roosevelt Decries the Deprivations Suffered by His Rough Riders After Battle of San Juan Hill

Typed Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 465

Colonel Theodore Roosevelt writes to the father of one of his soldiers who was taken ill with typhoid fever. He thanks the father for his offer to send some food to the soldiers but condemns the government for not providing enough food, supplies, and medical treatment to his cavalry.
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Theodore Roosevelt Inscribes Photo of His 1905 Inaugural Address With His Keystone

Signed Photograph

1 page

SMC 466

Theodore Roosevelt famously argued for each man not to be treated in accordance with his wealth but for his value as a person--otherwise known as a "square deal." Roosevelt emphasized this in his 1905 inaugural address, of which this is a photo with his inscription of the square deal.
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Theodore Roosevelt Writes

Theodore Roosevelt Writes "Bully For You"

September 27, 1907

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 547

Here, in print, Theodore Roosevelt appropriates the word "bully" to use as a commendation.
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Theodore Roosevelt on Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address:

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 548

Theodore Roosevelt accepts compliments on his address for the upcoming cornerstone ceremonies of the Lincoln birthplace, and is grateful that his words are not printed alongside the immortal Gettysburg address.
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With World War I Still Raging, Theodore Roosevelt Mourns His Fallen Son

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 550

Writing a fortnight after the death of his favorite son, Quentin, Theodore Roosevelt admits his difficulty, and remarks that "the old should not live when the young die."
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Theodore Roosevelt, Readying for His Inauguration, Complains of Bad Tailoring

Autograph Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 584

In this marvelous letter, Theodore Roosevelt, about to be inaugurated for the second time, takes a haberdasher to task for some shoddy tailoring.
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Theodore Roosevelt Jr. Looks Forward to Receiving Books on Judaism

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 925

After lunching with Lincoln biographer and Jewish activist Emmanuel Hertz, Theodore Roosevelt Jr. tells Hertz that he looks forward to receiving the latter's brother's book on Judaism, as well as the Jewish Publication Society's latest translation of the Bible.
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Theodore Roosevelt Jr. Has Received Jewish Books and is Reading Them With

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 926

Having received the Jewish books from Emmanuel Hertz, Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. follows up and tells him that he's already set to reading them with "the greatest of interest."
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Theodore Roosevelt Jr. Lists Favorite Parts from

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 927

Theodore Roosevelt Jr. avidly read Joseph Hertz's book about Jewish thought, and lists for Hertz's brother Emanuel, his favorite passages.
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Theodore Roosevelt Jr. Tells Emanuel Hertz He Will Always Try to Justify His Good Opinion

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 929

Having lunched together and corresponded for some half dozen years, Roosevelt tells Hertz it will always be his earnest endeavor to justify his good opinion.
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Theodore Roosevelt: a Condolence Letter on the Death of a Friend's Father

Autograph Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 1250

Roosevelt writes to his friend and family physician Dr. Alexander Lambert, whose father had recently passed away.
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Theodore Roosevelt Pens Congratulatory Letter on White House Card: Lauds Utica Public Library

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 1251

President Theodore Roosevelt salutes Utica philanthropist Frederick T. Proctor and the Public Library he supported, on the excellent work it is doing, and wishes it good luck.
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Theodore Roosevelt Bitterly Regrets Being Forced to Sit Through WWI At Home

Typed Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 1253

Roosevelt has lost one son to the Great War, and two have been badly injured in it. He can't stand the idea that his sons have been put in harm's way, whilst he remains at home, and finds it terrible that the war takes the young. Roosevelt also finds it "more terrible, of course, if the young fear to face death in a great crisis for a great cause."
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Edith Roosevelt on Her Husband's Recovery from an Assassination Attempt and the Bullet Left Inside Him

Autograph Letter Signed

3 pages

SMC 1254

Edith Roosevelt writes to a friend who had asked the Roosevelts for medical as well as financial guidance. Mrs. Roosevelt answers that the medical advice should be left to their family physician; Theodore will dispense with the financial advice after the medical issue is resolved. She mentions in passing that the surgeon has deemed it safer to leave the bullet in Theodore's chest, which makes her anxious.
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Theodore Roosevelt Writes From

Typed Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 1255

Before departing Panama, Theodore Roosevelt writes to Dr. Manuel Amador Guerrero who, as the first President of Panama, received Roosevelt when he visited the Canal Zone in November, 1906. Roosevelt and Amador had worked together on creating the Panama Canal, and here Roosevelt thanks Amador for his thoughtful gifts.
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A Final Roar: In One of His Last Letters, Theodore Roosevelt Blasts Woodrow Wilson

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 1256

Three days before he died, Theodore Roosevelt, by then unable to rise from the sofa and write, dictated this letter. In it, he finds the strength to lambast Woodrow Wilson for erring "in intellectual honesty and moral straight-forwardness," as well as finding fault in his own "single error," which was to support Wilson for the first sixty days of World War I.
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Theodore Roosevelt on the

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 1257

Theodore Roosevelt, who had recently created the Progressive party when he lost the Republican party nomination to Taft, takes stock.
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President Theodore Roosevelt Signs a Mint White House Card

White House Card

1 page

SMC 1269

President Theodore Roosevelt renamed the Executive Mansion "The White House," and wastes no time ordering and signing the new White House stationery.
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Former President Theodore Roosevelt Writes About Taking Books on His Upcoming Safari to Africa

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 1274

Former President Theodore Roosevelt tells Samuel Crothers that he has limited space for books while on safari, but is bringing Crothers's A Gentle Reader.
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Theodore Roosevelt:

Typed Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 1276

Theodore Roosevelt expresses his admiration for Abraham Lincoln and wishes to emulate him in championing the cause of the common people.
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Theodore Roosevelt Blames Woodrow Wilson for the Sinking of Lusitania, Killing 1198 People in May, 1915

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 1278

Theodore Roosevelt resented Woodrow Wilson's weak position on German naval aggression. Here, he unequivocally states that had Wilson shown some strong leadership and stood up to Germany, over 1000 civilians would not have lost their lives at sea.
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Famous Painting by John Falter of the 1912 Attempted Assassination of Theodore Roosevelt

Ephemera

1 page

SMC 1540

This painting depicts the exact moment when Theodore Roosevelt rose to give a speech, and his secretary - an ex-football player named Elbert H. Martin - glimpsed the gun and leapt from the car onto the would-be assassin.
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Newly Sworn-in Theodore Roosevelt Expresses Foreboding: a Heavy and Painful Task Has Fallen Upon Him

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 1541

Grief-stricken over the death of President William McKinley just hours before, newly sworn-in Theodore Roosevelt describes the task before him as both "heavy" and "painful."
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Mark Twain Excoriates Theodore Roosevelt as a Butcher, a Ruffian and a Bully

Autograph Manuscript

4 pages

SMC 1706

In an unpublished article, Mark Twain excoriates Theodore Roosevelt for bullying a fifteen-year-old girl and for promoting a man who, it was well known, was "brutal" to a woman in a waiting room.
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First Lady Edith Roosevelt, Two Weeks After McKinley's Death:

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 1778

Two weeks after President McKinley's death and Theodore Roosevelt's assumption of the presidency, First Lady Edith Roosevelt thanks a friend in Boston for her warm wishes, and confides in her that "Life does not seem very simple just now."
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Vice President Theodore Roosevelt, On Hearing that McKinley Has Been Shot, Wires For News

Autograph Telegram Signed

2 pages

SMC 1939

On the back of a railway timetable, Roosevelt writes the wire instructing the head of the facility in which McKinley was taken after being shot to keep Roosevelt appraised of the president's condition. On the other side of the page, a historian wrote Roosevelt's reaction to the news of McKinley's shooting, as well as his reaction to being told McKinley would survive.
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Theodore Roosevelt Lambasts Woodrow Wilson for Refusing to Let Him Lead a Division in World War I

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 2022

Fifty-nine year old, arthritic, overweight Theodore Roosevelt lambasts President Woodrow Wilson for refusing to allow him to lead a division in World War I, calling it Wilson's inability to "rise above the cheapest kind of party politics."
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Theodore Roosevelt Accepts a Gift of Fine Fabric From Which to Make His 1905 Inauguration Day Suit

Typed Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 2345

Theodore Roosevelt eagerly accepts the gift of a fine fabric with which to make his 1905 inauguration suit.
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