Ulysses S. Grant Original Historic Letters and Documents

Collection

    • A
    • B
    • C
    • E
    • F
    • H
    • L
    • M
    • N
    • P
    • R
    • S
    • T
    • W
    • Z
    • B
    • D
    • E
    • F
    • G
    • H
    • M
    • N
    • P
    • W
    • A
    • B
    • C
    • E
    • F
    • G
    • H
    • J
    • K
    • L
    • M
    • N
    • P
    • R
    • T
    • V
    • W
Year
All
All Decades
  • 1750
  • 1760
  • 1770
  • 1780
  • 1790
  • 1800
  • 1810
  • 1820
  • 1830
  • 1840
  • 1850
  • 1860
  • 1870
  • 1880
  • 1890
  • 1900
  • 1910
  • 1920
  • 1930
  • 1940
  • 1950
  • 1960
  • 1970
  • 1980
  • 1990
All Years
  • 1700
  • 1701
  • 1702
  • 1703
  • 1704
  • 1705
  • 1706
  • 1707
  • 1708
  • 1709
All Years
  • 1710
  • 1711
  • 1712
  • 1713
  • 1714
  • 1715
  • 1716
  • 1717
  • 1718
  • 1719
All Years
  • 1720
  • 1721
  • 1722
  • 1723
  • 1724
  • 1725
  • 1726
  • 1727
  • 1728
  • 1729
All Years
  • 1730
  • 1731
  • 1732
  • 1733
  • 1734
  • 1735
  • 1736
  • 1737
  • 1738
  • 1739
All Years
  • 1740
  • 1741
  • 1742
  • 1743
  • 1744
  • 1745
  • 1746
  • 1747
  • 1748
  • 1749
All Years
  • 1750
  • 1751
  • 1752
  • 1753
  • 1754
  • 1755
  • 1756
  • 1757
  • 1758
  • 1759
All Years
  • 1760
  • 1761
  • 1762
  • 1763
  • 1764
  • 1765
  • 1766
  • 1767
  • 1768
  • 1769
All Years
  • 1770
  • 1771
  • 1772
  • 1773
  • 1774
  • 1775
  • 1776
  • 1777
  • 1778
  • 1779
All Years
  • 1780
  • 1781
  • 1782
  • 1783
  • 1784
  • 1785
  • 1786
  • 1787
  • 1788
  • 1789
All Years
  • 1790
  • 1791
  • 1792
  • 1793
  • 1794
  • 1795
  • 1796
  • 1797
  • 1798
  • 1799
All Years
  • 1800
  • 1801
  • 1802
  • 1803
  • 1804
  • 1805
  • 1806
  • 1807
  • 1808
  • 1809
All Years
  • 1810
  • 1811
  • 1812
  • 1813
  • 1814
  • 1815
  • 1816
  • 1817
  • 1818
  • 1819
All Years
  • 1820
  • 1821
  • 1822
  • 1823
  • 1824
  • 1825
  • 1826
  • 1827
  • 1828
  • 1829
All Years
  • 1830
  • 1831
  • 1832
  • 1833
  • 1834
  • 1835
  • 1836
  • 1837
  • 1838
  • 1839
All Years
  • 1840
  • 1841
  • 1842
  • 1843
  • 1844
  • 1845
  • 1846
  • 1847
  • 1848
  • 1849
All Years
  • 1850
  • 1851
  • 1852
  • 1853
  • 1854
  • 1855
  • 1856
  • 1857
  • 1858
  • 1859
All Years
  • 1860
  • 1861
  • 1862
  • 1863
  • 1864
  • 1865
  • 1866
  • 1867
  • 1868
  • 1869
All Years
  • 1870
  • 1871
  • 1872
  • 1873
  • 1874
  • 1875
  • 1876
  • 1877
  • 1878
  • 1879
All Years
  • 1880
  • 1881
  • 1882
  • 1883
  • 1884
  • 1885
  • 1886
  • 1887
  • 1888
  • 1889
All Years
  • 1890
  • 1891
  • 1892
  • 1893
  • 1894
  • 1895
  • 1896
  • 1897
  • 1898
  • 1899
All Years
  • 1900
  • 1901
  • 1902
  • 1903
  • 1904
  • 1905
  • 1906
  • 1907
  • 1908
  • 1909
All Years
  • 1910
  • 1911
  • 1912
  • 1913
  • 1914
  • 1915
  • 1916
  • 1917
  • 1918
  • 1919
All Years
  • 1920
  • 1921
  • 1922
  • 1923
  • 1924
  • 1925
  • 1926
  • 1927
  • 1928
  • 1929
All Years
  • 1930
  • 1931
  • 1932
  • 1933
  • 1934
  • 1935
  • 1936
  • 1937
  • 1938
  • 1939
All Years
  • 1940
  • 1941
  • 1942
  • 1943
  • 1944
  • 1945
  • 1946
  • 1947
  • 1948
  • 1949
All Years
  • 1950
  • 1951
  • 1952
  • 1953
  • 1954
  • 1955
  • 1956
  • 1957
  • 1958
  • 1959
All Years
  • 1960
  • 1961
  • 1962
  • 1963
  • 1964
  • 1965
  • 1966
  • 1967
  • 1968
  • 1969
All Years
  • 1970
  • 1971
  • 1972
  • 1973
  • 1974
  • 1975
  • 1976
  • 1977
  • 1978
  • 1979
All Years
  • 1980
  • 1981
  • 1982
  • 1983
  • 1984
  • 1985
  • 1986
  • 1987
  • 1988
  • 1989
All Years
  • 1990
  • 1991
  • 1992
  • 1993
  • 1994
  • 1995
  • 1996
  • 1997
  • 1998
  • 1999
Month
All
All Months
  • Jan
  • Feb
  • Mar
  • Apr
  • May
  • Jun
  • Jul
  • Aug
  • Sep
  • Oct
  • Nov
  • Dec
Day
All
All Days
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14
  • 15
  • 16
  • 17
  • 18
  • 19
  • 20
  • 21
  • 22
  • 23
  • 24
  • 25
  • 26
  • 27
  • 28
  • 29
  • 30
  • 31

Topic

Human Aspect

Type

Attribute

Save Search Parameters
Clear All

Manuscripts (10)

SORT BY
Last Added
  • Last Added
  • Date Written
  • A-Z
  • Relevance

Notice: Undefined variable: promoted_manuscripts in /home/website/public_html/wp-content/themes/shapell/collection.php on line 610
Ulysses S. Grant Says Mark Twain Has Offered Him

Autograph Letter Signed

3 pages

SMC 121

Here, Grant reports to his friend and advisor, George Childs, that he’s soured on the Century deal, and is being wooed by Twain’s own publishing firm, Charles L. Webster & Co.
Add to History Board Share
President Grant Stays an Execution of African-American Who Murdered a Jewish Peddler

Document Signed

1 page

SMC 144

President Grant issues a stay of execution for Thomas Wright, an African-American who murdered Samuel Rogerski, a Jewish peddler.
Add to History Board Share
At the behest of President Lincoln, General Grant Decline's Lee's Suggestion of Armistice Negotiations

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 147

General Grant obediently replies to Secretary of War Edward Stanton with repeated crossed out protestations that he was not trying to usurp any authority. He had previously written to Stanton to ask if he could accept General Lee's invitation to negotiate an armistice, and had received a rebuke from President Lincoln himself.
Add to History Board Share
Twain: Monuments Disappear, But Great Cities - and Reputations - Survive

Autograph Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 283

Writing shortly after the death of his friend, General Grant, Twain muses on the nature of legacy. He agrees with his correspondent that monuments to Grant will one day crumble though his reputation will live on. Twain then moves on to discuss the longevity of cities, and even touches on the issue of the origin debates, still being hotly debated in that year, 1885.
Add to History Board Share
Ulysses S. Grant Tries to Lose the Anti-Semite Label Engendered to Him by His Infamous “Jew Order”

Autograph Letter Signed

4 pages

SMC 394

Add to History Board Share
On His Penultimate Day in Office, President Ulysses S. Grant Announces His Intention to Travel the Globe

Autograph Letter Signed

2 pages

SMC 1142

Just before setting off on a two-year world tour, Grant arranges for bank dividends to be sent to his son and namesake, U.S. Grant, Jr. so that the latter can manage his affairs during the world tour.
Add to History Board Share
Fresh From His Capture of Vicksburg, Ulysses S. Grant Reports From Gettysburg:

Autograph Letter Signed

4 pages

SMC 1545

General Ulysses S. Grant assures Major General Banks-whose army lay in siege around the Mississippi-with two pieces of news. The first is that he is sending reinforcements. The second is that Major General George Meade defeated General Lee, and was pursuing him.
Add to History Board Share
Lincoln Asks General Grant as a Friend, for a Favor: Find a Place for His Son, Robert, on His Staff

Autograph Letter Signed

1 page

SMC 1548

In order to broker a compromise between his wife, who had already buried two sons, and Robert Todd, who desperately wished to experience the war, Lincoln writes to Grant, not as President, but as a friend, asking him to find a place on his staff for Robert to serve. Lincoln asks merely for his son to be given a nominal rank and that Lincoln himself, and not the public, would furnish his necessary means.
Add to History Board Share
Grant Finds Egypt More Interesting Than Any Other Place He Has Visited

Autograph Letter Signed

4 pages

SMC 1759

Grant marvels at Egypt's antiquity, at "ruins that have been standing - as ruins - some of them, for many ages before the beginning of the Christian era." This causes Grant to find Egypt more interesting than any other place he has visited.
Add to History Board Share
Ulysses S. Grant Comments on the Refugees Who Have Fled to Constantinople

Autograph Letter Signed

6 pages

SMC 1849

In Istanbul, Grant was struck by scenes of the refugees – many of them, Bulgarian Jews – who had fled the notoriously anti-Semitic Russian invaders during the just-concluded Russo-Turkish War. Grant also discusses the gift of an Arabian horse from the sultan and the logistics involved in shipping it back to the United States.
Add to History Board Share
More Results