Letters and notes from America's greatest satiricist, Mark Twain; from his early adulthood to last months.

Collection

    • G
    • R
Year
All
All Decades
  • 1750
  • 1760
  • 1770
  • 1780
  • 1790
  • 1800
  • 1810
  • 1820
  • 1830
  • 1840
  • 1850
  • 1860
  • 1870
  • 1880
  • 1890
  • 1900
  • 1910
  • 1920
  • 1930
  • 1940
  • 1950
  • 1960
  • 1970
  • 1980
  • 1990
All Years
  • 1700
  • 1701
  • 1702
  • 1703
  • 1704
  • 1705
  • 1706
  • 1707
  • 1708
  • 1709
All Years
  • 1710
  • 1711
  • 1712
  • 1713
  • 1714
  • 1715
  • 1716
  • 1717
  • 1718
  • 1719
All Years
  • 1720
  • 1721
  • 1722
  • 1723
  • 1724
  • 1725
  • 1726
  • 1727
  • 1728
  • 1729
All Years
  • 1730
  • 1731
  • 1732
  • 1733
  • 1734
  • 1735
  • 1736
  • 1737
  • 1738
  • 1739
All Years
  • 1740
  • 1741
  • 1742
  • 1743
  • 1744
  • 1745
  • 1746
  • 1747
  • 1748
  • 1749
All Years
  • 1750
  • 1751
  • 1752
  • 1753
  • 1754
  • 1755
  • 1756
  • 1757
  • 1758
  • 1759
All Years
  • 1760
  • 1761
  • 1762
  • 1763
  • 1764
  • 1765
  • 1766
  • 1767
  • 1768
  • 1769
All Years
  • 1770
  • 1771
  • 1772
  • 1773
  • 1774
  • 1775
  • 1776
  • 1777
  • 1778
  • 1779
All Years
  • 1780
  • 1781
  • 1782
  • 1783
  • 1784
  • 1785
  • 1786
  • 1787
  • 1788
  • 1789
All Years
  • 1790
  • 1791
  • 1792
  • 1793
  • 1794
  • 1795
  • 1796
  • 1797
  • 1798
  • 1799
All Years
  • 1800
  • 1801
  • 1802
  • 1803
  • 1804
  • 1805
  • 1806
  • 1807
  • 1808
  • 1809
All Years
  • 1810
  • 1811
  • 1812
  • 1813
  • 1814
  • 1815
  • 1816
  • 1817
  • 1818
  • 1819
All Years
  • 1820
  • 1821
  • 1822
  • 1823
  • 1824
  • 1825
  • 1826
  • 1827
  • 1828
  • 1829
All Years
  • 1830
  • 1831
  • 1832
  • 1833
  • 1834
  • 1835
  • 1836
  • 1837
  • 1838
  • 1839
All Years
  • 1840
  • 1841
  • 1842
  • 1843
  • 1844
  • 1845
  • 1846
  • 1847
  • 1848
  • 1849
All Years
  • 1850
  • 1851
  • 1852
  • 1853
  • 1854
  • 1855
  • 1856
  • 1857
  • 1858
  • 1859
All Years
  • 1860
  • 1861
  • 1862
  • 1863
  • 1864
  • 1865
  • 1866
  • 1867
  • 1868
  • 1869
All Years
  • 1870
  • 1871
  • 1872
  • 1873
  • 1874
  • 1875
  • 1876
  • 1877
  • 1878
  • 1879
All Years
  • 1880
  • 1881
  • 1882
  • 1883
  • 1884
  • 1885
  • 1886
  • 1887
  • 1888
  • 1889
All Years
  • 1890
  • 1891
  • 1892
  • 1893
  • 1894
  • 1895
  • 1896
  • 1897
  • 1898
  • 1899
All Years
  • 1900
  • 1901
  • 1902
  • 1903
  • 1904
  • 1905
  • 1906
  • 1907
  • 1908
  • 1909
All Years
  • 1910
  • 1911
  • 1912
  • 1913
  • 1914
  • 1915
  • 1916
  • 1917
  • 1918
  • 1919
All Years
  • 1920
  • 1921
  • 1922
  • 1923
  • 1924
  • 1925
  • 1926
  • 1927
  • 1928
  • 1929
All Years
  • 1930
  • 1931
  • 1932
  • 1933
  • 1934
  • 1935
  • 1936
  • 1937
  • 1938
  • 1939
All Years
  • 1940
  • 1941
  • 1942
  • 1943
  • 1944
  • 1945
  • 1946
  • 1947
  • 1948
  • 1949
All Years
  • 1950
  • 1951
  • 1952
  • 1953
  • 1954
  • 1955
  • 1956
  • 1957
  • 1958
  • 1959
All Years
  • 1960
  • 1961
  • 1962
  • 1963
  • 1964
  • 1965
  • 1966
  • 1967
  • 1968
  • 1969
All Years
  • 1970
  • 1971
  • 1972
  • 1973
  • 1974
  • 1975
  • 1976
  • 1977
  • 1978
  • 1979
All Years
  • 1980
  • 1981
  • 1982
  • 1983
  • 1984
  • 1985
  • 1986
  • 1987
  • 1988
  • 1989
All Years
  • 1990
  • 1991
  • 1992
  • 1993
  • 1994
  • 1995
  • 1996
  • 1997
  • 1998
  • 1999
Month
All
All Months
  • Jan
  • Feb
  • Mar
  • Apr
  • May
  • Jun
  • Jul
  • Aug
  • Sep
  • Oct
  • Nov
  • Dec
Day
All
All Days
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14
  • 15
  • 16
  • 17
  • 18
  • 19
  • 20
  • 21
  • 22
  • 23
  • 24
  • 25
  • 26
  • 27
  • 28
  • 29
  • 30
  • 31

Topic

Human Aspect

Type

Attribute

Save Search Parameters
Clear All

    Manuscripts (40)

    SORT BY
    Last Added
    • Last Added
    • Date Written
    • A-Z
    • Relevance
    Mark Twain and Olivia Langdon: Twain Writes Ecstatically On The Pursuit Of His Future Wife

    Autograph Letter Signed

    3 pages

    SMC 1852

    Add to History Board Share
    Mark Twain Mourns an

    Autograph Letter Signed

    4 pages

    SMC 2377

    Add to History Board Share
    Twain Asks His Young

    Autograph Letter Signed

    4 pages

    SMC 2111

    Add to History Board Share
    Rare Receipt for Passage on the 1867

    Document Signed

    1 page

    SMC 2295

    Add to History Board Share
    Original Painting of the Steamship

    Historical artifacts

    1 page

    SMC 2303

    Add to History Board Share
    A Rare 1879 Reprint of

    Signed Book

    1 page

    SMC 2384

    A rare inscribed reprint of Innocents Abroad inscribed by Twain to his wife, Livy. In the past thirty years, only one other book transcribed by Twain to his wife has appeared. This double-volume edition is premium; bound in morocco and gilt.
    Add to History Board Share
    What's in a Name: Samuel Clemens Defines Mark Twain

    Autograph Note Signed

    2 pages

    SMC 2117

    Samuel Clemens explains his nom de plume as originating as a navigational term along the Mississippi. "Mark Twain" signified a depth sounding of two fathoms, and was called out by the leadsman; it was a term Twain, having served as a riverboat captain, would have heard daily.
    Add to History Board Share
    1862 Nevada Directory Listing Mark Twain as Assistant Secretary of the Nevada Territory

    Ephemera

    2 pages

    SMC 2077

    This rare, early Directory, in which both Clemens and his brother Orion are listed, records for posterity those two months - beginning October 1, 1861 - when "Samuel Clemens" worked as a dollar-a-day clerk for his brother, during the long opening session of the Nevada Territorial Legislature.
    Add to History Board Share
    Mark Twain Names His Lecture Tour About Holy Land Trip:

    Autograph Letter Signed

    1 page

    SMC 117

    Twain's use of the title, The American Vandal Abroad – a play on The Innocents Abroad - suggests that perhaps American tourists to the Holy Land weren't always so innocent. Twain recorded, aghast, how these religious pilgrims sliced off souvenirs from venerable biblical sites in Palestine.
    Add to History Board Share
    Mark Twain to French Jewish Writer Marcel Schwob:

    Autograph Letter Signed

    1 page

    SMC 118

    Here Twain denounces a French translation of a story he did not write, pronouncing it a "singularly unpleasant production." He assures Schwob that he has been deceived: "I do commit crimes," he writes, "but they are not of this grade."
    Add to History Board Share
    Mark Twain's Mockup of Title Page and Dedication of

    Autograph Manuscript Signed

    2 pages

    SMC 119

    Mark Twain's handwritten mockup of the title page and dedication of More Tramps Abroad with a note about Innocents Abroad.
    Add to History Board Share

    Autograph Letter Signed

    2 pages

    SMC 120

    Samuel Clemens, speaking in third person, referring to himself as "the American historian of Joan of Arc," regretfully declines an invitation to meet the French ambassador. He signs the letter as "Mark," though he also refers to himself as Clemens.
    Add to History Board Share
    Ulysses S. Grant Says Mark Twain Has Offered Him

    Autograph Letter Signed

    3 pages

    SMC 121

    Here, Grant reports to his friend and advisor, George Childs, that he’s soured on the Century deal, and is being wooed by Twain’s own publishing firm, Charles L. Webster & Co.
    Add to History Board Share
    Mark Twain's Autograph Notes Regarding People, Places, and Recalling an Incident

    Autograph Note

    6 pages

    SMC 125

    Mark Twain's notes from 1907, in two sections. One, in the manner of a questionnaire, matches names to places (Joe Goodman's, for instance, with "San Francisco, and Alameda") and indicates where Clemens had not been (Los Angeles & Palmyra); the other section mostly concerns an incident, and includes dialogue.
    Add to History Board Share
    Mark Twain 1868 Signed Photo

    Signed Photograph

    1 page

    SMC 132

    Signed photo of Mark Twain on the occasion of his speaking tour about his excursion to the Holy Land.
    Add to History Board Share
    Mark Twain On His House

    Autograph Letter Signed

    3 pages

    SMC 281

    Samuel Clemens writes to his daughter Jean about the new house, "Innocence at Home," President Grover Cleveland's morality and abilities, and the doctor's orders for her epilepsy.
    Add to History Board Share
    Mark Twain, on the Heroic Writing, and Fantastic Success, of Ulysses S. Grant's Memoirs

    Autograph Letter Signed

    6 pages

    SMC 282

    Samuel Clemens encloses a copy of General Grant's memoirs, calling them "the most admirably simple, direct, and unpretentious story that was ever put on paper by a supremely great man."
    Add to History Board Share
    Twain: Monuments Disappear, But Great Cities - and Reputations - Survive

    Autograph Letter Signed

    2 pages

    SMC 283

    Writing shortly after the death of his friend, General Grant, Twain muses on the nature of legacy. He agrees with his correspondent that monuments to Grant will one day crumble though his reputation will live on. Twain then moves on to discuss the longevity of cities, and even touches on the issue of the origin debates, still being hotly debated in that year, 1885.
    Add to History Board Share
    Famous Mark Twain Aphorism About Deserving Honors

    Autograph Quotation Signed

    2 pages

    SMC 284

    Mark Twain signs the back of a menu for the The Willard Hotel in January of 1906. The aphorism: "On the whole, it is better to deserve honors & not have them, than to have them & not deserve them."
    Add to History Board Share
    Mark Twain Inquires if Alfred Dreyfus Was Struck in the Face With the Hilt of a Sword

    Autograph Letter Signed

    1 page

    SMC 388

    Here, Samuel Clemens, who had been in Paris when the Dreyfus affair struck, urgently seeks a detail of Dreyfus' degradation and abuse.
    Add to History Board Share
    Mourning Daughter Susy, Mark Twain Describes His Family Life as Adrift, Indifferent, and Derelict

    Autograph Letter Signed

    3 pages

    SMC 484

    Mark Twain describes the listlessness of his family life since the sudden death of his daughter Susy. Whereas once they had a charted course, now they are adrift. And what is more, they are "derelict" and indifferent to their plight.
    Add to History Board Share
    A Calling Card Signed as Samuel L. Clemens and Mark Twain

    Card Signed

    1 page

    SMC 503

    Samuel Clemens's calling card, signed on the back as Mark Twain and Samuel Clemens.
    Add to History Board Share
    Manuscript from Mark Twain's Missing 1867 Notebook, Announcing His Intention to Travel Abroad

    Autograph Note

    2 pages

    SMC 911

    In this leaf from one of Mark Twain's missing notebooks, the young author writes of his upcoming journey to Europe and the Levant. Twain would chronicle the trip in The Innocents Abroad, a book that which would launch his career as a writer.
    Add to History Board Share
    Young Mark Twain, in Maui, Sets Out to

    Autograph Letter Signed

    2 pages

    SMC 1575

    Young Mark Twain, during his four month stint in Hawaii, makes plans to see Haleakala, a volcano on Maui.
    Add to History Board Share
    Mark Twain Directs His Publisher to Set Two Lines of Text in Facsimile, Not Typeface

    Autograph Note Signed

    1 page

    SMC 1617

    A brief note regarding composition from Mark Twain, directing either Elisha or Frank Bliss to set something up in facsimile rather than type.
    Add to History Board Share
    Olivia Clemens Quotes “Mr. Clemens” - Mark Twain - About a Phrase in “Following the Equator”

    Autograph Letter Signed

    2 pages

    SMC 1670

    Add to History Board Share
    Mark Twain on Ralph Waldo Emerson: His Grammar is Like Gravel in Bread

    Autograph Letter Signed

    2 pages

    SMC 1673

    Mark Twain gently Emerson's prose as being like "gravel in the bread," while at the same time complimenting Laura Wright Benjamin on her husband, William Wright, whose nom de plume was Dan de Quille.
    Add to History Board Share
    Mark Twain Discovers His Newfound Celebrity Status Upon his Return from His

    Autograph Letter Signed

    2 pages

    SMC 1681

    Mark Twain only realizes that his correspondence from his travels have made him something of a celebrity writer upon his return.
    Add to History Board Share
    From

    Autograph Quotation Signed

    1 page

    SMC 1682

    Mark Twain's handwritten irreverent soliloquy from the Tomb of Adam in the Holy Land from Innocents Abroad.
    Add to History Board Share
    Mark Twain Signed Photo by Abdullah Frères in Constantinople

    Carte de Visite

    1 page

    SMC 1683

    Photo signed as Samuel Clemens, taken in 1867 in Constantinople by Abdullah Frères. Clemens was in the midst of his trip on "The Quaker City," which also took him to the Holy Land.
    Add to History Board Share
    Mark Twain on His Book

    Autograph Letter Signed

    8 pages

    SMC 1684

    A long and flirtatious letter from the young bachelor Mark Twain to Emma Beach, primarily about their recently shared “Quaker City” excursion to Europe and the Holy Land. He discusses, amongst other things, a lecture he's been up all night writing, and how the photos taken of him in Egypt are a terrible likeness.
    Add to History Board Share
    Mark Twain's Last Day in New York Before Leaving on the

    Autograph Letter Signed

    2 pages

    SMC 1686

    A letter written in the wee hours of the morning after an evening and night spent drinking. Twelve hours later, Twain would be aboard "The Quaker City."
    Add to History Board Share
    Mark Twain Promotes his

    Autograph Letter Signed

    2 pages

    SMC 1687

    Dan Slote, Mark Twain's roommate on the "Quaker City" voyage, has sold about 200 copies of The Innocents Abroad to his friends, and given away about a dozen more. He is very well-connected, and can sell more copies. Twain asks his publisher to supply Slote with about 50 more copies of the book at a 40% discount, to be paid after he's sold the books.
    Add to History Board Share
    Mark Twain Lists His Favorite Books For Children - And Himself

    Autograph Letter Signed

    3 pages

    SMC 1688

    Twain is asked by a correspondent for recommended reading. Here he lists his favorite books.
    Add to History Board Share
    Mark Twain Says He Cannot Deliver a

    Autograph Letter Signed

    4 pages

    SMC 1693

    Mark Twain explains he cannot deliver a "light & nonsensical speech" while fatally wounded President Garfield is dying. Signed as Samuel Clemens.
    Add to History Board Share
    Mark Twain on the French: No Humor, No Depth, No Compass, No Balance, No...

    Autograph Letter Signed

    4 pages

    SMC 1695

    Mark Twain deflects the responsibility for offending a Madame Blanc, and blames her French lack of humor.
    Add to History Board Share
    Mark Twain Can't Remember Recent Things But Vividly Recalls His Hannibal Courier Co-Workers

    Autograph Letter Signed

    3 pages

    SMC 1699

    Mark Twain declares that "recent names & things take no hold" on his "bald-headed memory; they slip-up & slide off" so he isn't sure about a Mrs. Brackett - but to the mention of names and things from thirty-five years ago, his memory is alert.
    Add to History Board Share
    Mark Twain Excoriates Theodore Roosevelt as a Butcher, a Ruffian and a Bully

    Autograph Manuscript

    4 pages

    SMC 1706

    In an unpublished article, Mark Twain excoriates Theodore Roosevelt for bullying a fifteen-year-old girl and for promoting a man who, it was well known, was "brutal" to a woman in a waiting room.
    Add to History Board Share
    Mark Twain on the San Francisco Earthquake and a Picture He Cannot Get Out of His Mind

    Autograph Letter Signed

    2 pages

    SMC 1708

    Though himself a writer, Mark Twain says that the picture of the San Francisco earthquake entitled "The Spirit of Humanity," expresses the tragedy of the earthquake in a way that words cannot.
    Add to History Board Share
    More Results