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American History & Jewish History Blog
May 30, 2023

US National Archives: Jewish Soldiers in the Civil War, The Union Army

What was it like to be Jewish in Lincoln’s armies? The Union army was as diverse as the embattled nation it sought to preserve, comprising a unique mixture of ethnicities, religions, and identities. Almost one Union soldier in four was born abroad, and natives and newcomers fought side by side, sometimes uneasily. Author Adam D. Mendelsohn draws for the first time upon the vast Shapell Roster database of verified listings of Jewish soldiers serving in the Civil War, as well as letters, diaries, and newspapers to examine the collective experience of Jewish soldiers and to recover their voices and stories. Hosted by the US National Archives.

 

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